Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study

Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study


Older adults with hearing loss are less likely to be hospitalized or to visit the emergency room when they wear hearing aids, compared to those who don’t, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers examined Medicare payment data collected in 2013 and 2014 for 1,336 adults 65 and older with hearing loss. Overall, 734 people, or 55 percent, didn’t wear hearing aids.

During the study period, 24 percent of people with hearing aids and 26 percent of those without the devices visited an emergency room at least once, the study found. With hearing aids, 20 percent of people were hospitalized, compared to 22 percent without the devices. > >> read more ...

Fish Oil Eases Pain of Osteoarthritis

Fish Oil Eases Pain of Osteoarthritis


A new UK study has revealed how making simple dietary changes and exercising could help to relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Surrey, the new analysis is the largest and most up to date of its kind. The team looked at 68 studies to assess the relationship between nutrition and the risk or progression of osteoarthritis, the most prevalent form of arthritis in the world.

Eighteen percent of women and 9.6 percent of men aged 60 years and over are known to have been diagnosed with the condition, although many think the true number of those affected may in fact be much higher.  > >> read more ...

Poll Finds Sex Still Important to Many Seniors

Poll Finds Sex Still Important to Many Seniors


If you think seniors abandon their sex lives as the physical woes of aging descend upon them, a new survey suggests otherwise.

The reality is that 40 percent of older Americans still have sex, while 54 percent of older couples still do it, according to a new poll from the University of Michigan.

Even more couples — 61 percent — say that sex matters for their quality of life. Luckily, 73 percent of those aged 65 to 80 are satisfied with their sex lives.

To older folks, those numbers might not sound so surprising, said Erica Solway, co-associate director of the university’s National Poll on Healthy Aging, published May 3. But, she added, the results might be eye-opening to younger people who think aging spells the end of romance. > >> read more ...

Physically Fit Seniors Have Better Language Skills: Study

Physically Fit Seniors Have Better Language Skills: Study


Older adults who exercise regularly may have an easier time finding words to express themselves than their peers who aren’t as physically fit, a small study suggests.
Researchers examined results from 28 volunteers, mostly in their late 60s or early 70s, who played word games on a computer and performed aerobic fitness tests on an exercise bike. They also studied a control group of young adults in their early 20s who completed just the language evaluations.

For the word games, participants were asked to name famous people such as authors, actors, and politicians based on 20 questions. They were also given definitions of 20 words rarely used in daily conversation as well as 20 very common words and asked whether they knew the word relating to the definition. > >> read more ...

Swedish Study Reveals Secret to Long, Healthy Life

Swedish Study Reveals Secret to Long, Healthy Life


An ongoing Swedish study has revealed some of the key steps that we can all take to age healthier and stay independent for longer, even after the age of 90.

Researchers at Uppsala University have shared some of the findings from their ongoing Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a study that began in 1970 and looks at 2,322 men who were born in the early 1920s.

The latest follow-up found that 276 of the 369 men originally taking part were still living alone and leading an independent life, even though the average age of the participants is now 87. > >> read more ...

Enzyme That Influences Aging, Cancer Decoded: Study

Enzyme That Influences Aging, Cancer Decoded: Study


Elated scientists announced Wednesday the completion of a 20-year quest to map the complex enzyme thought to forestall aging by repairing the tips of chromosomes in plants and animals, including humans.

Decoding the architecture of the enzyme, called telomerase, could lead to drugs that slow or block the aging process, along with new treatments for cancer, they reported in the journal Nature.

“It has been a long time coming,” lead investigator Kathleen Collins, a molecular biologist at the University of California in Berkley, said in a statement. > >> read more ...

Opioids Raise Risk of Falling in Seniors

Opioids Raise Risk of Falling in Seniors


Elderly people who are prescribed opioids may be at higher risk for injuries from falls, some of which may be fatal, a Canadian analysis of trauma cases suggests.
Researchers studied more than 67,000 injured patients over age 65 who were admitted to trauma centers in Quebec between 2004 and 2014. The average age was 81.

Overall, people with a recent opioid prescription were 2.4 times more likely to have been injured in a fall than other trauma patients, the study found.

And among all patients with fall-related injuries, those with recent opioid prescriptions were 58 percent more likely to die in the hospital than patients who were not using these painkillers. > >> read more ...

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise


Older adults, drink up. You need plenty of water during exercise so your brain gets the full benefits of working out, researchers say.

“Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration, and subsequently may reduce the cognitive [mental] health-related benefits of exercise,” said Brandon Yates, of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, and colleagues.

The researchers noted that previous studies have shown that dehydration reduces exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on seniors. > >> read more ...

Healthy Diet May Preserve Vision, Says Expert

Healthy Diet May Preserve Vision, Says Expert


Healthy eating may help preserve your vision as you age, eye experts say.

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) damages the macula (a small area near the center of the retina, located on the inside back layer of the eye), leading to a decline in central vision.

There is no cure for AMD, which affects about 10 million Americans. It’s the leading cause of vision loss in adults aged 50 and older. Along with age, smoking and family history, a poor diet is a major risk factor for AMD. > >> read more ...

Low Testosterone Linked to Chronic Disease: Study

Low Testosterone Linked to Chronic Disease: Study


New US research has found that a lower level of testosterone could have a negative effect on a man’s risk of developing chronic disease.

Previous research has already linked low levels of testosterone to sexual health and muscle mass. However, the new study, carried out by researchers from Michigan Medicine at the University of Michigan, set out to look at whether there was also an association between testosterone, age and chronic disease.

“If we look at data for men from a population level, it has become evident over time that chronic disease is on the rise in older males,” explained lead author of the study Mark Peterson. “But we’re also finding that a consequence of being obese and physically inactive is that men are seeing declines in testosterone even at younger ages.” > >> read more ...