Dr. Oz: How to Boost Your Immune System as You Age

Dr. Oz: How to Boost Your Immune System as You Age


 
Listen up. It’s true: Your immune system is challenged by the passing decades. Diversity among disease-fighting T- and B-cells declines; your innate immunity – that is, protection provided by your skin, sweat and tears, and a general inflammatory response – changes; and you develop inflammaging. Really, that’s what they call it! Inflammaging is the accumulation of inflammatory mediators in your tissue (oh, those random aches and pains).

But you can do a great deal to promote a more robust immune system as you age. You are never too young or too old to start accumulating the benefits of improved nutrition, increased physical activity, better sleep and less unmanaged stress. > >> read more ...

Oldest Human Virus Found in Bronze Age Skeleton 4,500 Years Old

Oldest Human Virus Found in Bronze Age Skeleton 4,500 Years Old


The oldest known human virus has been found by British scientists on a 4,500-year-old Bronze Age skeleton.

Traces of Hepatitis B (HBV) were found in DNA recovered from a collection of bones from parts of Eurasia, the Daily Mail reported. About 25 of 300 specimens contained evidence of HBV infection, and of those 12 skeletons had enough genetic code to analyze in detail.

“Scientists mostly study modern virus strains and we have mainly been in the dark regarding ancient sequences — until now,” Cambridge University professor and joint study author Dr. Terry Jones said of the findings, the Daily Mail reported. “It was like trying to study evolution without fossils.” > >> read more ...

Surgeons’ Skills Increase With Age, Says Study

Surgeons’ Skills Increase With Age, Says Study


Surgeons’ skills may improve with age, and male and female surgeons perform equally well, a recent U.S. study finds.
Medicare patients’ risk of dying in the month after an operation steadily fell as their surgeon’s age increased, Dr. Yusuke Tsugawa of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA in Los Angeles and colleagues report in The BMJ.

There was little difference between mortality among patients of male or female doctors, with one exception. “Patients treated by female surgeons in their 50s had the lowest mortality across all groups,” Tsugawa told Reuters Health in a telephone interview. > >> read more ...

Survey Shows Young Americans Are Loneliest Age Group

Survey Shows Young Americans Are Loneliest Age Group


Young Americans may be the loneliest age group, even more lonely than those over 72, according to a study by insurer Cigna.

The national loneliness score overall was 44 on a 20-to-80 scale, but 18- to 24 year-olds surveyed reported loneliness scores of 48, while those 72 and older only had scores of around 39, USA Today reported.

About half of the respondents reported feeling lonely, Fortune said, while 54 percent said they feel like no one actually knows them well. Forty percent said they “lack companionship,” their “relationships aren’t meaningful,” and they feel “isolated by others.” > >> read more ...

CTE Symptoms Advanced by Playing Football Before Age 12

CTE Symptoms Advanced by Playing Football Before Age 12


Playing tackle football before age 12 can advance the start of CTE brain disease symptoms – by 2.5 years for each year played – among people who eventually develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a new study suggests.

The study from Boston University’s School of Medicine was detailed in the latest edition of the Annals of Neurology and was based on post-mortem analysis of the brains of 211 football players diagnosed with CTE, the Boston Herald reported.

Researchers at Boston University and the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System participated in the examination and analysis of the brains. > >> read more ...

Raising Retirement Age Toughest on Least Educated: Study

Raising Retirement Age Toughest on Least Educated: Study


People with little education and low socioeconomic status are more likely to leave the workforce in midlife for health reasons than better educated and higher-status workers, suggests a review of research across four developed countries.
In the context of national policies to extend working life by raising retirement ages, the most vulnerable workers may not be capable of working extra years, the study authors write in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

“Population ageing and rising old age dependency ratios have led many governments to increase statutory retirement age,” said lead author Ewan Carr of Kings College London in the UK. “However, remaining in work until or beyond pensionable age may be challenging for those with low socioeconomic positions,” Carr said in an email. > >> read more ...

Tooth Loss in Middle Age Tied to Heart Disease: Study

Tooth Loss in Middle Age Tied to Heart Disease: Study


Losing two or more natural teeth in middle age may signal an increased risk for coronary heart disease, a U.S. study suggests.
“In addition to other established associations between dental health and risk of disease, our findings suggest that middle-aged adults who have lost two or more teeth in recent past could be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease,” Dr. Lu Qi of Tulane University in New Orleans said in a statement. “That’s regardless of the number of natural teeth a person has as a middle-aged adult, or whether they have traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as poor diet or high blood pressure.” > >> read more ...

Obesity Can Cause Liver Damage by Age 8: Study

Obesity Can Cause Liver Damage by Age 8: Study


Obesity can lead to liver disease in kids as young as 8 years old, a new study warns.

The long-term study of 635 children in Massachusetts found that a bigger waist size at age 3 increases the odds that a child will have a marker for liver damage and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by age 8.

That marker is called ALT. By age 8, 23 percent of children studied had elevated blood levels of ALT. Those with a bigger waist size at age 3 and those with larger increases in obesity between ages 3 and 8 were more likely to have elevated ALT at age 8, the researchers found. > >> read more ...

Brain Doesn’t Create New ‘Learning’ Cells After Age 13: Study

Brain Doesn’t Create New ‘Learning’ Cells After Age 13: Study


Around the age of 13, the human brain region that hosts memory and learning appears to stop producing nerve cells, said a study Wednesday described as “sobering”.

The finding challenges a widely-held view that the brain’s hippocampus region continues to generate neurons, which transmit information through chemical and electrical signals, well into adulthood in humans, as in other mammals.

Neurons are the cells that allow animals to react to their environment by transferring data about external stimuli such as a smell or sound to the central nervous system, and from there to muscles and glands to respond appropriately. > >> read more ...

Urine Test May Reveal Body’s True Age: Study

Urine Test May Reveal Body’s True Age: Study


A simple urine test apparently can reveal how old your body really is — showing its biological, not chronological age.

That information can then help determine your risk for age-related diseases and even death, a new study suggests.

The test checks for a substance — called a marker — that indicates cellular damage from a process known as oxidation. The substance increases in urine as people get older.

“As we age, we suffer increasing oxidative damage, and so the levels of oxidative markers increase in our body,” explained study co-author Jian-Ping Cai, a researcher at the National Center of Gerontology at Beijing Hospital in China. > >> read more ...