Enzyme That Influences Aging, Cancer Decoded: Study

Enzyme That Influences Aging, Cancer Decoded: Study


Elated scientists announced Wednesday the completion of a 20-year quest to map the complex enzyme thought to forestall aging by repairing the tips of chromosomes in plants and animals, including humans.

Decoding the architecture of the enzyme, called telomerase, could lead to drugs that slow or block the aging process, along with new treatments for cancer, they reported in the journal Nature.

“It has been a long time coming,” lead investigator Kathleen Collins, a molecular biologist at the University of California in Berkley, said in a statement. > >> read more ...

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease


Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests.

The small, preliminary study isn’t proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit: Treated children with the disease progeria were more likely than others to survive during the two-year study. But some kids taking the drug in this and other studies have lived into their late teens. Researchers and others say the results suggest a potential breakthrough for a heartbreaking condition that typically kills kids before they reach adulthood. > >> read more ...

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise

Staying Hydrated Helps Aging Brains Get More From Exercise


Older adults, drink up. You need plenty of water during exercise so your brain gets the full benefits of working out, researchers say.

“Middle-age and older adults often display a blunted thirst perception, which places them at risk for dehydration, and subsequently may reduce the cognitive [mental] health-related benefits of exercise,” said Brandon Yates, of Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, and colleagues.

The researchers noted that previous studies have shown that dehydration reduces exercise performance and brain function in young people, but less is known about its impact on seniors. > >> read more ...

Hard Times Can Accelerate Brain Aging

Hard Times Can Accelerate Brain Aging


Divorce, death in the family, money troubles and serious health problems don’t just stress you out — these negative life events may actually accelerate the aging of your brain, new research suggests.

“We used a new algorithm to predict brain aging after horrible life events — like divorce or death — and negative life events accelerate brain aging by about one-third of a year for each event,” said study lead author Sean Hatton, a project scientist at the University of California, San Diego. > >> read more ...

Aging Accelerated in Cancer Survivors: Study

Aging Accelerated in Cancer Survivors: Study


Even decades after treatment, cancer survivors tire more easily than people with no history of the disease, according to new research.

The findings hint at a pattern of “accelerated aging” for people with a cancer history.

“The main goal of cancer treatment has been survival, but studies like this suggest that we need also to examine the longer-term effects on health and quality of life,” said the study’s senior author, Jennifer Schrack. She’s an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. > >> read more ...

Video Games May Help Aging Pooches Stay Sharp

Video Games May Help Aging Pooches Stay Sharp


At first sight, enthusiastic Border Collies Miley and Tiara may not appear to be providing insights into the deeper workings of the canine mind.

Even while demonstrating an experiment used in a recent study at Vienna’s University of Veterinary Medicine, they’re having too much fun.

It involves them running to a touchscreen with one round and one square shape. Every time they hit the round shape with their noses, they’re rewarded with a treat.

The results gathered after hundreds of dogs took part in the study suggest that older dogs benefit from similar games, just as Sudoku and other brain exercises can help their owners stay mentally agile. > >> read more ...

Studies Find the Mediterranean Diet Slows Aging

Studies Find the Mediterranean Diet Slows Aging


Six new articles published in The Journals of Gerontology, Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences found that a Mediterranean diet may slow aging.

The articles reported on elements of the diet including the positive relationship between the diet and physical and cognitive function, the value of taking a coenzyme Q10 supplement while sticking to the diet, and the role of the diet in reducing inflammation.

“Greater clarity on how this diet is defined, in both interventions and observational studies, will be critical in the aim of achieving a consensus on how to optimally apply this dietary pattern towards maximizing healthy aging,” the authors wrote. > >> read more ...

Diet Supplement Reverses Aging: Harvard Report

Diet Supplement Reverses Aging: Harvard Report


A molecule in supplements already on the market can make blood vessels younger and healthier, according to a new study involving mice.

Harvard Medical School researchers found that boosting levels of the naturally occurring molecule NMN, also found in humans, increased levels of another biological compound in mice — called NAD+ — which in turn raised levels of a well-known anti-aging enzyme, the Boston Globe reports.

The impact was so significant that researchers said it helped reverse age-related deterioration of blood vessels of 20-month-old mice — akin to 70-year-old humans — to make them more youthful. > >> read more ...

Lifetime of Exercise Could Slow Aging: Study

Lifetime of Exercise Could Slow Aging: Study


Keeping active throughout life could help keep the body younger and healthier as we age according to new UK research.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Birmingham and King’s College London, the study set out to look at whether a lifetime of exercise had slowed down aging in a group of older adult participants.

The researchers recruited 125 male and female healthy amateur cyclists, who were aged 55 to 79 and had been cycling for nearly all of their adult lives.  > >> read more ...

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