Scientists Develop More Accurate Peanut Allergy Test

Scientists Develop More Accurate Peanut Allergy Test


British scientists have developed a far more accurate blood test to diagnose peanut allergy, offering a better way to monitor a significant food hazard.
Peanuts are the most common cause of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis, or severe allergic reaction, and allergy cases among children have risen sharply in recent years. Britain’s Food Standards Agency estimates up to one in 55 children have a peanut allergy.

In contrast to existing skin-prick and other blood tests that produce a large number of false positive results, the new diagnostic has 98 percent specificity, researchers from the Medical Research Council (MARC) reported on Thursday. > >> read more ...

Blame Climate Change for Your Worst Allergy Season Ever

Blame Climate Change for Your Worst Allergy Season Ever


Think every year is your worst allergy season ever? It’s not your imagination, Vox reported. This really could be the worst one, and each year gets worse. Experts are blaming climate change for ever higher concentrations of pollen in the air.

More people are complaining about increasingly severe allergies than ever before and this is only being enhanced by changes in the average temperature.

The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America reported that since 1995 the duration of allergy season has been extended by 11 days to 27 days, thanks to warmer temperatures that create more pollen in the air, stronger airborne allergens and more allergy symptoms. > >> read more ...

Peanut Allergy Vaccine Successful in Mice

Peanut Allergy Vaccine Successful in Mice


A new vaccine created at the University of Michigan appears to turn off peanut allergies in mice. The nasal vaccine protected the mice from allergic reactions after only three doses.

The mouse models that were allergic to peanuts exhibited symptoms similar to those in humans, which included itchy skin and trouble breathing. Researchers gave the mice a dose of the vaccine once a month for three months and gauged the protection for allergic reactions two weeks after mice were given the final dose of the vaccine. > >> read more ...

Vitamin A in Cattle Feed May Protect Against Milk Allergy: Study

Vitamin A in Cattle Feed May Protect Against Milk Allergy: Study


The vitamin A added to cattle feed may protect against milk allergies, says a study from Vienna’s University of Veterinary Medicine.

While uncommon in adults, an allergy to cow’s milk is the most common food allergy in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, 5 to 15 percent of infants show adverse reactions to cow’s milk protein, such as lactose intolerance, and estimates of actual cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) vary from 2 percent to 7.5 percent. > >> read more ...

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