Music May Calm Alzheimer’s Patients: Study

Music May Calm Alzheimer’s Patients: Study


Music therapy might help ease the anxiety and agitation that plagues many Alzheimer’s patients, researchers suggest.

“People with dementia are confronted by a world that is unfamiliar to them, which causes disorientation and anxiety,” said study co-author Dr. Jeff Anderson, an associate professor of radiology at the University of Utah Health.

“We believe music will tap into the salience network of the brain that is still relatively functioning,” he added in a university news release. > >> read more ...

Texas Dad, 45, Faces Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Texas Dad, 45, Faces Early Onset Alzheimer’s


Early onset Alzheimer’s is a condition true to its name, 45-year-old Texas dad Matt Oliver will tell you.

The former Army veteran and military contractor first began experiencing symptoms in his 30s, Men’s Health reported. Fast forward to the present day and the father of three cannot drive, has difficulty speaking and he struggles with his speech, memory and simple tasks.

While Alzheimer’s is most prevalent among the elderly, it is not uncommon to occur in people under the age of 65. > >> read more ...

’60 Minutes’ Report Details Progression of Alzheimer’s

’60 Minutes’ Report Details Progression of Alzheimer’s


Filmed over 10 years, a “60 Minutes” report this weekend shows in startling detail the progression that Alzheimer’s disease takes on a patient.

CBS medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook began interviewing Mike and Carol Daly of Staten Island, New York, in 2008, shortly after Carol learned of her diagnosis. She was mildly forgetful but functional, although upset at how it had affected her ability to cook, or enjoy books and movies.

“I don’t want to be like this, I really don’t,” said Carol Daly, then 65. > >> read more ...

Lifelong Air Pollution Raises Alzheimer’s Risk: Study

Lifelong Air Pollution Raises Alzheimer’s Risk: Study


New US research has found that growing up in a city with a high level of air pollution could increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and progression of the disease.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Montana, the study looked at the effects of air pollution in Mexico City, where 24 million people in the metropolitan area are exposed daily to concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone pollution above US Environmental Protection Agency standards. > >> read more ...

Losing One Night’s Sleep Raises Alzheimer’s Brain Protein: Study

Losing One Night’s Sleep Raises Alzheimer’s Brain Protein: Study


Losing just one night’s sleep causes an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, proteins in the brain that clump together to form brain plaques characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, say researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

While studies have found that acute sleep deprivation causes an increase in beta-amyloid levels in mice, evidence has been less compelling in humans. The new study is the first to show that sleep helps to clear beta-amyloid, a metabolic waste product present in the fluid between brain cells, from the human brain. > >> read more ...

Scientists Neutralize Gene That Causes Alzheimer’s

Scientists Neutralize Gene That Causes Alzheimer’s


For the first time, scientists have neutralized the primary genetic risk factor that causes Alzheimer’s disease. Using human brain cells, scientists at California’s Gladstone Institutes discovered how the gene called APOE4 increases the risk for Alzheimer’s, and also found a potential solution.

There are three different types of the APOE gene — APOE2, APOE3, and APOE4 — and everyone has two copies of the gene. While the E2 version, which is the rarest form, decreases the risk of having Alzheimer’s and the E3 version appears to have no effect on risk, having one copy of the APOE4 gene more than doubles a person’s odds of developing Alzheimer’s. Having two copies increases the risk by 12-fold. > >> read more ...

New Method of Defining Alzheimer’s Hopes to Diagnose Disease Sooner: Experts

New Method of Defining Alzheimer’s Hopes to Diagnose Disease Sooner: Experts


In an effort to speed research toward a cure for the most common form of dementia, experts urged a new framework Tuesday to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease using biological clues, rather than symptoms of memory loss.

Alzheimer’s affects some 44 million people around the world, but remains poorly understood, with no effective treatments despite billions of dollars spent on research.

Clinical trials have stumbled, with recent research showing that up to 30 percent of participants trying experimental drugs did not have the Alzheimer’s disease-related brain change targeted by the medicine. > >> read more ...

New Way to Define Alzheimer’s Aims at Finding Disease Sooner

New Way to Define Alzheimer’s Aims at Finding Disease Sooner


A new way to define Alzheimer’s disease — basing it on biological signs, such as brain changes, rather than memory loss and other symptoms of dementia — is being proposed by scientists in hopes of providing better treatment.

The move is aimed at improving research, by using more objective criteria like brain scans to pick patients for studies and enroll them sooner in the course of their illness, when treatments may have more chance to help.

But it’s too soon to use these scans and other tests in routine care, because they haven’t been validated for that yet, experts stress. For now, doctors will still rely on the tools they’ve long used to evaluate thinking skills to diagnose most cases. > >> read more ...

New Blood Test Detects Alzheimer’s Risk Before Symptoms Appear

New Blood Test Detects Alzheimer’s Risk Before Symptoms Appear


Alzheimer’s disease has no cure, and drug treatments offer minimal help. Many experts believe that progress in drug research is hindered by the fact that although the disease is thought to begin long before symptoms become obvious, it can’t be diagnosed until the disease has progressed. An earlier diagnosis might provide time for an effective intervention.

German scientists have developed a blood test for Alzheimer’s long before symptoms, like memory loss, appear. > >> read more ...

Long-Term Caffeine Use Worsens Alzheimer’s Symptoms: Study

Long-Term Caffeine Use Worsens Alzheimer’s Symptoms: Study


Memory loss is the symptom most associated with Alzheimer’s disease, but there are also many neuropsychiatric symptoms that may be present even in its early stages. Known as Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD), they include anxiety, apathy, depression, hallucinations, and paranoia.

Coffee or caffeine has recently been suggested as a tactic to prevent dementia, both in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and in normal aging processes. Normally, caffeine blocks molecules in the brain called adenosine receptors that can cause dysfunction and disease in old age. However, some research indicates that once the cognitive symptoms occur, caffeine may have the opposite effect. > >> read more ...