Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study


Concussions, even those that are mild, more than double the risk for developing dementia down the road, new research suggests.

The findings stem from an analysis that tracked concussions and dementia risk among nearly 360,000 military veterans.

Study author Deborah Barnes noted that many of the younger vets in the study had experienced concussions while in combat, often in Iraq and Afghanistan. Head blows among older vets were often due to falls or car accidents.

“Results were similar in the two groups,” she said, “so we don’t think there is anything special about these head injuries.” That makes it more likely that the dementia risk seen among military personnel would also apply to the general population. > >> read more ...

New Bio Says Robin Williams Suffered From Dementia

New Bio Says Robin Williams Suffered From Dementia


Robin Williams suffered from dementia, a new biography says, according to Deadline.

The book, “Robin,” is written by Dave Itzkoff and details the final stages of the actor’s life, revealing how the illness impacted his emotions, physical health and memory to such an extent that he ultimately took his own life in 2014.

Robin Williams was initially diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease but a neuropathologist later determined that he was suffering from Lewy body dementia, the second most common neurodegenerative dementia after Alzheimer’s. > >> read more ...

Anxiety in Mid-Life Linked to Dementia Later: Study

Anxiety in Mid-Life Linked to Dementia Later: Study


People with moderate to severe anxiety in middle age may be more likely to develop dementia as they get older, a recent study suggests.
Researchers examined data from four previously published studies that tracked a total of almost 30,000 people for at least a decade. In each of the smaller studies, there was a clear connection between anxiety in midlife and dementia later on, researchers report in BMJ Open.

“If people are living with moderate to severe anxiety we would encourage them to seek help,” said senior study author Natalie Marchant of University College London in the UK. > >> read more ...

Some Antidepressants Tied to Dementia: Study

Some Antidepressants Tied to Dementia: Study


Long-term use of certain anti-depressants have been linked to dementia in a large British study, researchers said Thursday, though they could not definitively conclude that the drugs were the cause.

The study in more than 300,000 people in Britain found that those diagnosed with dementia were almost a third more likely to have been prescribed so-called anticholinergic medicines to treat depression and certain bladder conditions between four and 20 years earlier.

“What we don’t know for sure is whether the medication is the cause” of the dementia, said George Savva from the University of East Anglia’s School of Health Science. He had co-authored the study in the BMJ medical journal. > >> read more ...

Controlling Blood Pressure Keeps Dementia at Bay: Study

Controlling Blood Pressure Keeps Dementia at Bay: Study


Bringing high blood pressure under control can reduce older black Americans’ risk of dementia, a new study finds.

Black people are at high risk for high blood pressure and dementia, the researchers noted.

The study included more than 1,200 black Americans, aged 65 and older, with high blood pressure who did not have dementia. The patients took different types of medications for their high blood pressure and were followed for up to 24 years.

The medications included beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks and diuretics. > >> read more ...

Dementia: Number and Severity of Brain Injuries Raise Risk, Says Study

Dementia: Number and Severity of Brain Injuries Raise Risk, Says Study


Suffering a traumatic brain injury from a blow to the head boosted dementia risk by 24 percent in a Danish study group of nearly three million people, researchers said Wednesday.

The survey of 36 years’ worth of data — collected from the Danish national patient register — found that the risk of dementia rose with the number and severity of brain injuries, a team wrote in The Lancet Psychiatry, a medical journal.

“Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI)… have an increased risk of developing dementia, even decades after the injury,” said study leader Jesse Fann of the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. > >> read more ...

Reduce Your Dementia Risk by Using Saunas

Reduce Your Dementia Risk by Using Saunas


A sauna bath may do more than simply help you relax. A recent study has found men who take a sauna bath four to seven times weekly may reduce their risk of dementia by a whopping 66 percent.

The 20-year study, conducted by the University of Eastern Finland, involved more than 2,000 men and revealed that the more frequently saunas were taken, the lower the risk of dementia.

These results follow on the heels of previous results showing the frequent sauna bathing also significantly reduces the risk of sudden cardiac death, the risk of death due to coronary heart disease as well as overall mortality. > >> read more ...

Eat Beets to Stave Off Heart Disease, Dementia

Eat Beets to Stave Off Heart Disease, Dementia


New research that shows that a component in beets may help slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease – the leading cause of dementia – adding to growing evidence of the health benefits this root vegetable offers.

The study, presented at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, found that betalain, the chemical that gives beets its distinctive red color, may help slow the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the brain, associated with Alzheimer’s disease. > >> read more ...

Slower Walking Speeds May Flag Dementia Risk: Study

Slower Walking Speeds May Flag Dementia Risk: Study


There is currently no cure for dementia, which includes its most common form, Alzheimer’s disease. But there are indicators that may give an early warning that dementia may be down the road.

One of those signals may be walking speed. Researchers have learned that older adults who walk slower than normal, even when they have no signs of dementia, have a greater risk of developing it than those who walk faster.

U.K. researchers attempted to learn more about how changes in walking speed are linked to changes in the ability to think and make decisions, and dementia. > >> read more ...

Being Fit in Middle-Age Lowers Dementia Risk for Women

Being Fit in Middle-Age Lowers Dementia Risk for Women


You may spend a lot of time working out, but there’s a fitness reward you might not expect: better memory in your senior years.

New research finds that being physically fit around age 50 lowers a woman’s risk of developing memory-robbing dementia by almost 90 percent.

And for those physically fit women who do end up with dementia, they tend to get it much later in life — about 10 years later than others.

“Keeping yourself fit — by exercising and having a healthy diet — may decrease your risk of getting dementia in old age. It will also make you feel better and will reduce your risk of other disorders, [such as heart problems],” said senior study author Dr. Ingmar Skoog. He’s director of the Center for Ageing and Health at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden. > >> read more ...