Healthy Diet Can Protect Against Diabetes: Harvard Study

Healthy Diet Can Protect Against Diabetes: Harvard Study


Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, but you can protect yourself with a healthier diet. And the same type of diet can help you manage diabetes if you already have it.

According to experts at Boston’s Joslin Diabetes Center and the Harvard School of Public Health, specific foods that help reduce your risk include green leafy vegetables, oat cereal, yogurt and dairy products, grapes, apples, blueberries and walnuts. Surprisingly, coffee and decaf java are also on the list. > >> read more ...

50% of Diabetes Cases Going Undiagnosed

50% of Diabetes Cases Going Undiagnosed


Many people are being overlooked for diabetes screening — for reasons such as age or not being diagnosed as “obese” — and researchers are warning such oversight can miss up to 50 percent of diabetes and prediabetes cases.

Dr. Matthew O’Brien, assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University’s School of Medicine, found that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force’s age and weight-based recommendations do not take into account some racial and ethnic considerations, as well as important medical conditions, according to UPI. > >> read more ...

Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study

Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study


People who are deficient in vitamin D have a five-fold increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University.

Our bodies make vitamin D, often called the “sunshine vitamin,” when the skin is exposed to sunlight. But many Americans are deficient in vitamin D, and others live on the brink of deficiency even in the sunniest of months. Studies have linked low vitamin D levels with compromised immune systems, heart disease, and a host of other ailments. > >> read more ...

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity


Diabetes and obesity could be linked to artificial sweeteners, a new study has found.

Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University believe that zero-calorie sweeteners could change the way the body metabolizes fat and gets its energy, Newsweek reported.

They also found that acesulfame potassium, a component commonly found in artificial sweeteners, accumulated in the blood and posed a harmful effect on the cells that line blood vessels.

Experts have blamed the over consumption of sugar as the main culprit behind the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic in the U.S., The Guardian reported. > >> read more ...

‘Well Done’ Meat Tied to Risk of Diabetes, Liver Disease

‘Well Done’ Meat Tied to Risk of Diabetes, Liver Disease


People who eat lots of processed and red meat are at increased risk of developing chronic liver disease and insulin resistance, a diabetes risk factor – especially if they like their steak well done, an Israeli study suggests.
Researchers focused on what’s known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which is associated with obesity and certain eating habits. While red and processed meat has long been linked to an increased risk of diabetes, certain cancers and heart disease, evidence to date has been mixed about its connection to liver disease. > >> read more ...

Diabetes Now Strikes 23 Million Americans: CDC

Diabetes Now Strikes 23 Million Americans: CDC


The latest tally of Americans adults affected by diabetes finds more than 23 million struggle with the blood sugar disease.

Of those, the vast majority — 21 million cases — are caused by type 2 diabetes, which is often linked to overweight or obesity, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Another 1.3 million cases are attributed to type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disorder where the body fails to produce enough of the blood sugar hormone insulin. > >> read more ...

Diabetes Drugs Linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Diabetes Drugs Linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease


A relatively new breed of diabetes drugs has been linked with an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease, a digestive condition that causes stomach pain and bloating.

Researchers say the drugs, known as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, pose low risks, but say doctors should be aware of the potential link and take care when prescribing such medications to certain patients who may be at risk, according to the study, published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

“Although our findings need to be replicated, physicians should be aware of this possible association and perhaps refrain from prescribing DPP-4 inhibitors for people at high risk, such as those with a family history of disease or with known autoimmune conditions,” the researchers concluded. > >> read more ...

FDA Approves Diabetes Glucose-Monitoring System

FDA Approves Diabetes Glucose-Monitoring System


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved DexCom Inc.’s monitoring system to check blood sugar levels in children and adults suffering from diabetes, which can be used along with devices such as insulin pumps.

The company’s shares rose as much as 3.7 percent to $72.75 in regular trading on Tuesday and closed at $69.99.

This is the first glucose monitoring system permitted by the agency that can be used with other compatible medical devices, the FDA said. > >> read more ...

High-Tech Biosensors Revolutionize Diabetes, Heart Disease Care

High-Tech Biosensors Revolutionize Diabetes, Heart Disease Care


Imagine a tiny, implantable sensor that can directly monitor levels of blood sugar, oxygen, lactate, and other vital elements of body chemistry in real time, then transmit the data to your doctor via cell phone.

A California-based company called Profusa has developed a biosensor smaller than a grain of rice that can perform such functions, measuring levels of various substances in the body. The information is then passed along via an optical scanner held to the skin.

“I think our sensors will revolutionize medicine,” declares Natalie Wisniewski, Profusa’s co-founder and chief technical officer. “They produce a continuous stream of data that gives us insight into the biochemical fluctuations that reflect our health.” > >> read more ...

Pecans Fight Heart Disease and Diabetes: Study

Pecans Fight Heart Disease and Diabetes: Study


Eating just a small handful of pecans a day may protect overweight and obese adults against developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in Nutrients.

Researchers at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University found that incorporating about one-and-a-half ounces of pecans into a typical American diet significantly improved insulin sensitivity and had a marked effect on markers of cardiometabolic disease in overweight and obese adults with excess belly fat. > >> read more ...