Study: Face Masks May Be Ineffective Against Air Pollution

Study: Face Masks May Be Ineffective Against Air Pollution


Face masks available to consumers in China for protection against air pollution vary widely in their real-world performance, suggests a recent study.

Although a mask may filter tiny particles as advertised, face size and shape as well as movement can lead to leakage as high as 68 percent, researchers report in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

“Even if the filtration efficiency of the mask is high, and the mask fits the person initially, the mask may not continue to give a good fit as the person goes about their daily activities — walking, talking, and more,” said senior study author Miranda Loh, an exposure and environmental scientist at the Institute of Occupational Medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland. > >> read more ...

Hospitals Face Opioid Shortage Crisis: Survey

Hospitals Face Opioid Shortage Crisis: Survey


U.S. hospitals are running short of the injectable opioids and anesthesia drugs that most surgery patients need during and after their procedures, a new survey shows.

More than 98 percent of anesthesiologists responding to the survey said they regularly experience shortages of these drugs.

And recent efforts by the federal government to curb the opioid crisis — by cutting back on the raw materials used to make opioids — may partly explain why.

Unfortunately, 95 percent of those surveyed said the shortages have affected the way they treat their patients. > >> read more ...

LGBTQ Youth Face Mental Challenges: Three Studies

LGBTQ Youth Face Mental Challenges: Three Studies


Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth may be more likely than their heterosexual and gender-conforming peers to experience abuse, bullying and mental health problems, three U.S. studies suggest.
While plenty of previous research has documented a variety of psychological issues that can be more common among LGBTQ children and teens, these new studies published in Pediatrics offer fresh insight into the types of challenges these youth encounter that may negatively impact their mental and physical health. > >> read more ...

Man with 3 Faces: Frenchman Gets 2nd Face Transplant

Man with 3 Faces: Frenchman Gets 2nd Face Transplant


Jerome Hamon received a second face transplant in a medical first, a French surgeon said, and Hamon is now doing well and even spent a recent weekend in Brittany.

Dr. Laurent Lantieri of the Georges Pompidou hospital in Paris first transplanted a new face onto Hamon in 2010. But after getting ill in 2015, Hamon was given drugs that interfered with anti-rejection medicines he was taking for his face transplant.

Last November, complications led Lantieri to remove the transplanted face. That left Hamon without a face, in a condition Lantieri describes as “the walking dead.” > >> read more ...

Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks

Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks


Adult survivors of childhood cancer have a greater risk of heart disease and develop risk factors like high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol earlier in life compared to the general population, a German study suggests.

Researchers studied 951 adults, ages 23 to 48, who had been diagnosed with cancer when they were less than 15 years old. The study team looked at lab tests for risk factors for heart disease, and also for conditions like heart failure, stroke and heart attacks. Along with the cancer survivors, they studied more than 15,000 similar people who didn’t have malignancies as children. > >> read more ...

Smokers Face Greater Risk of Hearing Loss

Smokers Face Greater Risk of Hearing Loss


A study involving more than 50,000 participants found that smoking increased the risk of hearing loss.

The eight-year study analyzed data from annual health checkups, which included audio testing performed by a technician as well as a health-related lifestyle questionnaire completed by each participant.

Researchers examined the effects of smoking status (current, former, and never smokers), the number of cigarettes smoked per day, and the duration of smoking cessation on the extent of hearing loss. > >> read more ...

Selfies Distort Face, Plastic Surgeons Warn

Selfies Distort Face, Plastic Surgeons Warn


Selfies – or self-photographs – can distort the face and make the nose look larger than it is, according to plastic surgeons who say they’ve seen an uptick in requests for cosmetic procedures from people who want to look better in selfies.

“Patients under age 40 take out their phones and tell me they don’t like how they look,” said Dr. Boris Paskhover of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark.

“They literally show me a selfie of themselves and complain about their noses,” he told Reuters Health by phone. “I have to explain that I understand they’re not happy but what they’re seeing is distorted.” > >> read more ...

More Than a Third of Docs Face Burnout: Study

More Than a Third of Docs Face Burnout: Study


There’s a good chance your doctor is in the middle of a quiet battle with professional burnout, a new study suggests.

More than 1 out of 3 physicians assessed in the Cleveland Clinic Health System suffered from mental, emotional and physical exhaustion, said study author Amy Windover, a clinical psychologist with the Cleveland Clinic.

As a result, these doctors might have poor health themselves, and become less able to provide quality care to patients, the researchers added. > >> read more ...

Homemade Face Masks, The best ingredients for glowing skin

Homemade Face Masks, The best ingredients for glowing skin

Homemade face masks are the bees knees for healthy skin
Natural face masks offer so many benefits for skin. Adding ingredients rich in fatty acids, fruit acids and vitamins can repair sun damage, rehydrate skin by plumping out cells, and by stimulating the skins natural process of repair and renewal.
Even some of the most simple ingredients in home made facial masks can repair damage and promote collagen production by invigorating your skin’s cells, waking them up and stimulating them into action. > >> read more ...

‘Face Yoga’ May Beat Botox, Facelifts

‘Face Yoga’ May Beat Botox, Facelifts


To his toolbox of Botox, fillers and plastic surgery, cosmetic dermatologist Dr. Murad Alam has added a new, low-cost, noninvasive anti-aging treatment: facial yoga.

Dermatologists measured improvements in the appearance of the faces of a small group of middle-age women after they did half an hour of daily face-toning exercises for eight weeks, followed by alternate-day exercises for another 12 weeks.

The results surprised lead author Alam, vice chair and professor of dermatology at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. > >> read more ...

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