Exercise Helps Chronic Health Problems, Say Experts

Exercise Helps Chronic Health Problems, Say Experts


Exercise can help prevent many chronic illnesses as well as make it easier to manage health conditions, from diabetes to joint pain.

In terms of prevention, aim for the recommended 150 minutes of exercise, like brisk walking or cycling, each week. Along with eating a healthy diet, this can cut your risk of diabetes by more than a third, plus increase your level of good cholesterol. Exercise also lowers body weight, blood pressure and triglycerides, thus reducing key risk factors for heart disease. > >> read more ...

Congo Health Ministry Confirms 2 Cases of Ebola

Congo Health Ministry Confirms 2 Cases of Ebola


Congo’s health ministry has confirmed two cases of Ebola in this central African country, a resurgence nearly 10 months after the end of an earlier outbreak.

The Health Ministry said Tuesday that five samples were taken from suspected cases in Bikoro in the northwest. It said of the five samples sent to the National Institute of Biological Research in Kinshasa, two came back positive for Ebola.

It said since the notification of the cases on May 3, no deaths have been reported among those hospitalized or among health personnel. > >> read more ...

Shortage Fears for Doctors, Nurses, Health Aides

Shortage Fears for Doctors, Nurses, Health Aides


The United States faces a shortage of hundreds of thousands of positions in healthcare in the coming years, the global healthcare staffing consultancy Mercer says.

“Few other industries are racing the clock to find a future-ready workforce like today’s health care administrators,” Jason Narlock, senior consultant with Mercer, told CNN.

Mercer says the U.S. will need to hire 2.3 million new healthcare workers by 2025 in order to adequately take care of its aging population. But a persistent shortage of doctors, nurses, lab technicians and other industry workers threatens that need. > >> read more ...

US Seeks 1 Million Volunteers for Massive Study of DNA, Health Habits

US Seeks 1 Million Volunteers for Massive Study of DNA, Health Habits


Wanted: A million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science.

On Sunday, the U.S. government will open nationwide enrollment for an ambitious experiment: If they can build a large enough database comparing the genetics, lifestyles and environments of people from all walks of life, researchers hope to learn why some escape illness and others don’t, and better customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

“A national adventure that is going to transform medical care,” is how Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, describes his agency’s All of Us Research Program. > >> read more ...

Health Care Is New Front for Transgender Rights under Trump

Health Care Is New Front for Transgender Rights under Trump


Military service. Bathroom use. Job bias. And now, health care.

The Trump administration is coming under fire for rewriting a federal rule that bars discrimination in health care based on “gender identity.” Critics say it’s another attempt to undercut acceptance for transgender people.

The Health and Human Services Department rule dates to the Obama administration, a time when LGBT people gained political and social recognition. But a federal judge in Texas said the rule went too far by concluding that discrimination on the basis of gender identity is a form of sex discrimination, which is forbidden by civil rights laws. > >> read more ...

US More Prepared for Health Disasters, Says Report

US More Prepared for Health Disasters, Says Report


The United States is more ready for health disasters than it was five years ago, but certain regions still lag behind, a new report shows.

The nation scored 7.1 on the 10-point 2018 National Health Security Preparedness Index. That’s nearly 3 percent better than last year and nearly 11 percent better than when the index was introduced five years ago.

“Threats to America’s health security are on the rise, but so is our nation’s preparedness to deal with these emergencies,” said Alonzo Plough, chief science officer at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the health philanthropy that released the index. > >> read more ...

Improving Overall Heart Health May Lower A-Fib Risk

Improving Overall Heart Health May Lower A-Fib Risk


Following practices recommended for “optimal” heart health may also reduce the risk of developing a serious heart-rhythm disorder, researchers say.
A large U.S. study that followed middle-aged men and women for about 25 years found that those who stuck most closely to a list of seven heart-healthy practices were over 60 percent less likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those who met few or none of the list’s criteria.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the U.S., affecting about 2 million people, the study authors note in the Journal of the American Heart Association. > >> read more ...

Want Better Mental Health? Eat Produce Raw: Study

Want Better Mental Health? Eat Produce Raw: Study


New research has suggested that if you want to boost your mental health, eating raw fruit and vegetables could be more beneficial than cooked, canned and processed options.

Carried out by the University of Otago, New Zealand, the study set out to see if how we ate our fruit and vegetables could be just as important, if not more so, as how many we ate.  

Although many public health campaigns have pushed the idea of aiming for five portions of fruit and vegetables a day in any form, the new findings suggest it could also be important to consider in what way produce was prepared and consumed, especially for mental health benefits. > >> read more ...

China: Smog Cut but Health Damage Already Done, says Study

China: Smog Cut but Health Damage Already Done, says Study


While China has made progress cutting smog, the damage to the health of millions of people may already have been done, especially as the population ages, the head of a U.S.-based research agency said.
China faces about 1.6 million premature deaths a year as a result of air pollution, the U.S.-based Health Effects Institute (HEI) said in a report, based on data going back to 1990, published on Tuesday.

China cut concentrations of hazardous particles known as PM2.5 by 6.5 percent in 338 cities last year. Smog-prone northern regions also met 2013-2017 air quality targets after a winter campaign to cut industrial output, coal consumption and traffic. > >> read more ...

Parents’ Diets Before Conception Affect Child’s Health

Parents’ Diets Before Conception Affect Child’s Health


A child’s health can be compromised not only by a mother who smokes or drinks during pregnancy, but by the obesity and poor diet of both parents well before the act of procreation, researchers said Tuesday.

What a mother and father eat, and whether they are seriously overweight, in other words, can have “profound implications for the growth, development and long-term health of their children before conception,” they warned in a trio of studies.

The findings, reported in The Lancet, a leading medical journal, should heighten awareness of “preconception risk factors,” the researchers said. > >> read more ...