Eggs Don’t Increase Heart Risk in Diabetics

Eggs Don’t Increase Heart Risk in Diabetics


People who are prediabetic or diabetic can eat up to 12 eggs a week and not increase their risk of cardiovascular disease, says a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Researchers at the University of Sydney sought to clear up conflicting dietary advice about eating eggs — does it or doesn’t it increase cardiovascular disease? They discovered that at the end of three months, six months, and 12 months, there was no difference in cardiovascular risk markers between people who ate a low-egg diet (less than two eggs a week) and those who ate a high-egg diet (12 eggs a week), even for those who were diagnosed with diabetes or pre-diabetes. > >> read more ...

Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks

Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks


New European research has found that exposure to annoying levels of noise could increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm irregularity also known as heart flutter which can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other serious health conditions.

Carried out by researchers from the Department of Cardiology at the Mainz University Medical Center, Germany, the team looked at data taken from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS), one of the largest studies of its kind which has already looked at the effects of noise pollution on health. > >> read more ...

Less Saturated, Trans Fats Curb Heart Disease – WHO

Less Saturated, Trans Fats Curb Heart Disease – WHO


Adults and children should consume a maximum of 10 percent of their daily calories in the form of saturated fat such as meat and butter and one percent from trans fats to reduce the risk of heart disease, the World Health Organization said on Friday.
The draft recommendations, the first since 2002, are aimed at reducing non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases, blamed for 72 percent of the 54.7 million estimated deaths worldwide every year, many before the age of 70. > >> read more ...

Can a Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent and Treat Heart Disease?

Can a Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent and Treat Heart Disease?

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In the first of the Keto & Heart Disease series, we looked at the prevalence, risk factors and symptoms of heart disease. The main predictors of developing heart disease and the markers we should be focusing on are chronic inflammation, oxidation, metabolic markers and artery plaque. Let’s look at how we can reduce risk of heart disease by changing in our diet.

Heart Disease: Busting the Myths

Most people have grown up believing that high fat, high cholesterol foods like bacon and eggs, steak or shrimp will raise cholesterol levels, clog arteries and cause a heart attack. > >> read more ...

Opioids Increase Heart Infections | Newsmax.com

Opioids Increase Heart Infections | Newsmax.com


Here’s yet another consequence of the U.S. opioid crisis: a rise in serious heart infections in a state hard-hit by the drug epidemic.

A new study, done at West Virginia’s largest medical center, found that admissions for endocarditis related to drug abuse more than doubled between 2008 and 2015. That parallels an increase in drug use in the state.

Endocarditis is a life-threatening infection of the heart’s inner lining and valves. One way you get it is through using dirty needles to shoot heroin or other injection drugs. > >> read more ...

The True Cause of Heart Disease

The True Cause of Heart Disease

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Prevalence and Risk of Heart Disease

Normally the heart pumps blood and oxygen to the body’s cells through veins and arteries.

Heart disease describes a group of problems that occur when the heart and blood vessels aren’t working the way they should, for example a blood clot blocks an artery and the heart muscle is starved of oxygen, heart muscle cells die and lead to a heart attack; or, if blood flow to the brain is blocked or a blood vessel is ruptured this is a stroke. > >> read more ...

Positioning During Radiation Key to Heart Risks: Study

Positioning During Radiation Key to Heart Risks: Study


If you have lung or throat cancer, exactly how you are positioned during your radiation treatments may alter your chances of beating the disease.

New research suggests that even tiny shifts can mean the radiation may harm organs around tumors in the chest, most notably the heart.

“We already know that using imaging can help us to target cancers much more precisely and make radiotherapy treatment more effective,” said researcher Corinne Johnson, a Ph.D. student at the Manchester Cancer Research Center in England. > >> read more ...

Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack: Researchers

Exercise Halves Risk of Dying After Heart Attack: Researchers


Exercising after a heart attack may help stave off death for longer, Swedish researchers said Thursday.

A study which followed 22,000 heart attack survivors aged 18-74, found that those who boosted their exercise levels after being discharged from hospital, halved their risk of dying within the first four years.

“It is well known that physically active people are less likely to have a heart attack and more likely to live longer,” said Orjan Ekblom of the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences. > >> read more ...

Divorce Ups Odds of Second Stroke, Heart Attack: Study

Divorce Ups Odds of Second Stroke, Heart Attack: Study


New European research has found that those who survive a heart attack may be at a higher risk of a second one if they are divorced or have a low socioeconomic status.

Carried out by researchers from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, the large-scale study looked at 29,226 participants aged 40-76 one year after surviving their first heart attack.

The team recorded the marital status (married, unmarried, divorced, widowed), socioeconomic status (measured by disposable income) and and educational level (nine years or less, 10-12 years, more than 12 years) of each participant, and then continued to follow them for an average of four years. > >> read more ...

Improving Overall Heart Health May Lower A-Fib Risk

Improving Overall Heart Health May Lower A-Fib Risk


Following practices recommended for “optimal” heart health may also reduce the risk of developing a serious heart-rhythm disorder, researchers say.
A large U.S. study that followed middle-aged men and women for about 25 years found that those who stuck most closely to a list of seven heart-healthy practices were over 60 percent less likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those who met few or none of the list’s criteria.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder in the U.S., affecting about 2 million people, the study authors note in the Journal of the American Heart Association. > >> read more ...