Dr. Oz: How to Boost Your Immune System as You Age

Dr. Oz: How to Boost Your Immune System as You Age


 
Listen up. It’s true: Your immune system is challenged by the passing decades. Diversity among disease-fighting T- and B-cells declines; your innate immunity – that is, protection provided by your skin, sweat and tears, and a general inflammatory response – changes; and you develop inflammaging. Really, that’s what they call it! Inflammaging is the accumulation of inflammatory mediators in your tissue (oh, those random aches and pains).

But you can do a great deal to promote a more robust immune system as you age. You are never too young or too old to start accumulating the benefits of improved nutrition, increased physical activity, better sleep and less unmanaged stress. > >> read more ...

Fetal Immune System May Spark Premature Birth: Study

Fetal Immune System May Spark Premature Birth: Study


Most potential explanations of premature birth revolve around the mother, and what might cause her body to reject her developing fetus.

But what if it’s the other way around?

A new study suggests some preterm births occur because the fetus rejects the mother, after its immune system is triggered too early and senses maternal cells as foreign invaders.

Researchers found that umbilical cord blood drawn from preemies contained elevated levels of immune cells generated by the fetus. Subsequent lab tests revealed that this immune response had been activated specifically to attack the mother’s cells. > >> read more ...

Study: Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer

Study: Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer


For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds


Immune therapy improved lung cancer survival rates in a new study of those recently diagnosed with the disease in the biggest win so far for the treatment, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year, according to The Associated Press. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study

Immune Therapy Scores Big Win Against Lung Cancer in Study


For the first time, a treatment that boosts the immune system greatly improved survival in people newly diagnosed with the most common form of lung cancer. It’s the biggest win so far for immunotherapy, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Multiple Vaccines Don’t Weaken Kids’ Immune Systems: Study

Multiple Vaccines Don’t Weaken Kids’ Immune Systems: Study


Even though children are given far more vaccines than prior generations, the practice does not appear to weaken their immune systems or make them more prone to other infections, a US study said Tuesday.

The report in the Journal of the American Medical Association marks the first time researchers have probed a link between the current recommended immunization schedule — which includes up to 16 vaccinations — and the rate of infections and illnesses that are unrelated to vaccines among children in the United States. > >> read more ...

error: Content is protected !!