Kids Exposed to Smoke Have More ER Visits: Study

Kids Exposed to Smoke Have More ER Visits: Study


New US research suggests that exposing children to a combination of secondhand tobacco and marijuana smoke could increase their risk of otitis media (an infection in the middle ear that causes inflammation and a buildup of fluid behind the eardrum) and increase the number of visits to the emergency department (ED).

Carried out by Dr. Adam Johnson at Wake Forest University Baptist Health and Dr. Rakesh D.Mistry at the University of Colorado, the study set out to assess if there was a link between secondhand smoke from marijuana and the number of ED visits among children, as well as the rates of tobacco sensitive conditions including asthma, otitis media and viral respiratory infections. > >> read more ...

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease

Study Drug Gives Hope to Kids With Rapid Aging Disease


Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests.

The small, preliminary study isn’t proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit: Treated children with the disease progeria were more likely than others to survive during the two-year study. But some kids taking the drug in this and other studies have lived into their late teens. Researchers and others say the results suggest a potential breakthrough for a heartbreaking condition that typically kills kids before they reach adulthood. > >> read more ...

Many Brain-Injured Kids Don’t Get Enough Rehab: Study

Many Brain-Injured Kids Don’t Get Enough Rehab: Study


Many children hospitalized in the U.S. for brain injuries don’t receive all the rehabilitation services needed for them to potentially make a full recovery, a new study suggests.
Researchers interviewed parents and children four times over two years after kids had a head injury. Overall, children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries had greater functional impairments and required more rehab services than kids with mild injuries.

But severely injured kids were also more likely to get the help they needed, while more than one in four children with mild brain injuries failed to receive necessary services like educational support, mental health care and treatment from physiatrists – doctors who specialize in addressing brain and spinal cord conditions. > >> read more ...

Many Approaches Help Kids Improve Self-Regulation

Many Approaches Help Kids Improve Self-Regulation


Yoga, exercise, education and personal skills training are among the many types of interventions that may help kids improve what’s known as self-regulation, or their ability to manage their behavior and emotions, a study suggests.
Self-regulation covers a lot of things that kids need to succeed inside and outside the classroom, ranging from the ability to have positive interactions with others, the capacity to avoid inappropriate or aggressive actions, and the ability to carry out self-directed learning. Cognitive processes contributing to self-regulation are often referred to as “executive function” and can include impulse control as well as the ability to direct or focus attention, adapt flexibly to changes, and retain information. > >> read more ...

Diabetic Kids: Best Ways to Manage Childhood Blood Sugar

Diabetic Kids: Best Ways to Manage Childhood Blood Sugar


Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the body’s immune system fails to produce much-needed insulin. Once called juvenile-onset diabetes, it accounts for about 5 percent of all diabetes diagnoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, most often occuring in children between the ages of 5 to 7 years old.

For families, caring for a diabetic child means taking on a challenging, active role of learning everything about high and low blood sugar, glucose, insulin shots, meal planning and administering round-the-clock care. > >> read more ...

Influenza B in Flu’s Second Wave Can Hit Kids Even Harder

Influenza B in Flu’s Second Wave Can Hit Kids Even Harder


Flu season has a second wave, the CDC warned, with influenza B viruses possibly hitting kids harder than illness associated with influenza A.

Already had the flu? You can catch it again.

The flu season had been dominated by the A-strain virus, but now the B-strain appears to be taking precedence, making up almost 58 percent of the cases reported in the last few days, WFAA-TV reported.

A weekly surveillance report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that while the number of reported cases of Influenza A had declined, the number of Influenza B incidents were up. > >> read more ...

Ads During Sports Programs Promote Junk Food to Kids: Study

Ads During Sports Programs Promote Junk Food to Kids: Study


Three in four food advertisements and half of drink promotions during major U.S. sports programs peddle high-calorie, sugary products, a new study suggests.
“There is an inherent message in sports about the importance of physical fitness and health, and diet is a huge part of fitness and health,” lead study author Marie Bragg said by email. “Having highly visible sports organizations serve as a vehicle for promoting junk food to children sends a mixed message that is incompatible with maintaining a healthy diet.” > >> read more ...

Golf Carts Pose Serious Injury Risk to Kids: Study

Golf Carts Pose Serious Injury Risk to Kids: Study


Golf cart crashes involving children can result in serious injuries, a new study confirms.

Researchers found that children as young as nine years old were driving golf carts, often not wearing seat belts, and faced the risk of the cart overturning.

Non-automobile vehicles – like ATVs, go-karts, golf carts and others – “are often viewed as harmless or safe by parents and communities,” study coauthor Joseph Starnes told Reuters Health by email. “This is especially true for golf carts, which tend to be slower.” > >> read more ...

Kids Need More Counseling on Skin Cancer: Docs

Kids Need More Counseling on Skin Cancer: Docs


Fair-skinned children and young adults should get counseling on how to avoid sunburns that can lead to skin cancer, according to new guidelines from U.S. physicians.

Counseling should include advice on sunscreen use, protective clothing, hats and sunglasses to protect against harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays and also encourage people to avoid sun exposure during the brightest part of the day as well as indoor tanning, according to recommendations issued today by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). > >> read more ...

With Fitbit for Kids Parents Can Track Activity Levels, Sleep

With Fitbit for Kids Parents Can Track Activity Levels, Sleep


Fitbit is launching a fitness tracker for kids with revised software that allows parents to track their children’s activity levels and sleep, The Verge reported.

The Fitbit Ace is an adapted version of the Fitbit Alta, with a few adjustments to make it more appropriate for children aged eight and upwards.

Think smaller, like adjustable bands geared towards fitting a child’s wrist and elimination of certain functions not relevant to younger users, such as calorie counters. > >> read more ...