Healthy, Smoke-Free Lifestyle Tied to at Least an Extra Decade of Life

Healthy, Smoke-Free Lifestyle Tied to at Least an Extra Decade of Life


Adults who follow a healthy lifestyle in middle age may extend their lifespan by more than a decade and have a lower risk of dying from cancer or heart disease, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers focused on five habits long linked to a lower risk of developing or dying from variety of chronic medical problems: not smoking, limiting alcohol, exercising, eating well, and maintaining a healthy weight.

During more than three decades of follow-up, people who followed all five of these habits were 74 percent less likely to die from all causes, 82 percent less likely to die from heart disease and 65 percent less likely to die from cancer. > >> read more ...

Swedish Study Reveals Secret to Long, Healthy Life

Swedish Study Reveals Secret to Long, Healthy Life


An ongoing Swedish study has revealed some of the key steps that we can all take to age healthier and stay independent for longer, even after the age of 90.

Researchers at Uppsala University have shared some of the findings from their ongoing Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM), a study that began in 1970 and looks at 2,322 men who were born in the early 1920s.

The latest follow-up found that 276 of the 369 men originally taking part were still living alone and leading an independent life, even though the average age of the participants is now 87. > >> read more ...

How to Stop Burnout in Your Life

How to Stop Burnout in Your Life


Finding the right work-life balance isn’t easy. For many people, 9 to 5 has stretched to 9 to 7 — or longer. And responsibilities can start much earlier in the day, especially for those with kids to corral in the morning.

Burnout is nothing new — it was described back in the 1970s as a work-related state of distress, with symptoms like exhaustion and reduced productivity. Even more alarming, without intervention, it becomes chronic — a way of life. > >> read more ...

Drinking? Years Off Life If You Have More Than One, Study Says

Drinking? Years Off Life If You Have More Than One, Study Says


Drinking more than one alcoholic beverage a day can take years off your life, a new international study says.

The study found that people who down more than seven drinks a week can expect to die sooner than those who drink less.

“What this is saying is, if you’re really concerned about your longevity, don’t have more than a drink a day,” said David Jernigan, a Johns Hopkins University alcohol researcher who was not involved in the study.

While the U.S. government currently recommends no more than seven drinks a week for women, the recommendation for men is 14 drinks. That’s because earlier studies found women are hit by the effects of alcohol at lower amounts than men for several reasons, including women weigh less than men on average and blood alcohol concentrations rise faster. > >> read more ...

Drop in Air Pollution Increases Swedish Life Expectancy

Drop in Air Pollution Increases Swedish Life Expectancy


New research has found that those living in the Swedish cities of Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö live on average one year longer today than 25 years ago thanks to a decrease in the level of traffic pollution.

Carried out by researchers at the Department of Environmental Sciences and Analytical Chemistry (ACES), the team looked at results from measurement stations located in the center of each city which tracked the levels of nitrogen oxides, ozone and particles in the air from 1990 to 2015.  > >> read more ...

Why American Life Expectancy is Growing

Why American Life Expectancy is Growing


Americans appear to be aging slower than they used to, which may help explain recent gains in life expectancy, researchers say.

The researchers compared how biological age changed in the United States compared to age in years (chronological age). For the study, the investigators looked at national health surveys conducted 1988-1994 and 2007-2010.

“This is the first evidence we have of delayed ‘aging’ among a national sample of Americans,” study senior author Eileen Crimmins said in a University of Southern California news release. Crimmins is a professor of gerontology at USC. > >> read more ...

Obesity Tied to Shorter Life

Obesity Tied to Shorter Life


Obese people have shorter lives and even those who are just overweight spend more years living with heart disease than individuals who are a healthy weight, a U.S. study suggests.

Researchers examined data on more than 190,000 adults from 10 different studies conducted in the U.S. over the past seven decades that looked at weight and other factors that can influence the risk of heart disease. None of the participants had cardiovascular disease when they joined these studies, but at least 70 percent of men and about 60 percent of women aged 40 and older were overweight or obese. > >> read more ...

Want to Live a Long Life? Eat Less, New Research Suggests

Want to Live a Long Life? Eat Less, New Research Suggests


Putting just a bit less on your dinner plate each day might be key to a longer life, preliminary research suggests.

People who reduced their caloric intake by just 15 percent over two years experienced a significant decrease in their metabolism, according to a small clinical trial.

These folks also saw improvements in biomarkers associated with slower aging and longer life span, said lead researcher Leanne Redman. She’s an associate professor of clinical sciences at Pennington Biomedical Research in Baton Rouge, La. > >> read more ...

US Has Highest Health Costs, Lowest Life Expectancy

US Has Highest Health Costs, Lowest Life Expectancy


The U.S. spends about twice what other high-income nations do on healthcare but has the lowest life expectancy and the highest infant mortality rates, a new study suggests.

More doctor visits and hospital stays aren’t the problem. Americans use roughly the same amount of health services as people in other affluent nations, the study found.

Instead, health spending may be higher in the U.S. because prices are steeper for drugs, medical devices, physician and nurse salaries and administrative costs to process medical claims, researchers report in JAMA. > >> read more ...

New Hip May Add at Least a Decade to Life: Study

New Hip May Add at Least a Decade to Life: Study


A hip replacement may help seniors live longer — for at least a decade anyway, a new study from Sweden suggests.

“Our study suggests that hip replacement can add years to life as well as adding ‘life to years’ — increasing the chances of longer survival as well as improving the quality of life,” said study author Dr. Peter Cnudde. He’s an orthopedic surgeon with the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Register in Gothenburg.

Cnudde’s team analyzed data on nearly 132,000 residents of Sweden, 68 years old on average, who’d had a total hip replacement between 1999 and 2012. The patients’ progress was assessed for about six years after their operation. In that time, about 16 percent of the study participants died. > >> read more ...