Research Finds Family History Tied to Childhood Obesity

Research Finds Family History Tied to Childhood Obesity


New European research has revealed that a family history of health conditions such as obesity and high blood pressure could be key risk factors for the development of childhood obesity. 

Carried out by the University of Messina, Italy, the study set out to investigate if a family history of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases could influence the onset and severity of childhood obesity.

The researchers looked at 260 overweight and obese children aged between two and 17 years old and carried out a medical assessment on each participant. > >> read more ...

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity

Study Says Artificial Sweeteners May Be Linked With Diabetes, Obesity


Diabetes and obesity could be linked to artificial sweeteners, a new study has found.

Researchers from the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University believe that zero-calorie sweeteners could change the way the body metabolizes fat and gets its energy, Newsweek reported.

They also found that acesulfame potassium, a component commonly found in artificial sweeteners, accumulated in the blood and posed a harmful effect on the cells that line blood vessels.

Experts have blamed the over consumption of sugar as the main culprit behind the obesity and type 2 diabetes epidemic in the U.S., The Guardian reported. > >> read more ...

Wide Waist with ‘normal Weight’ Bigger Risk than Obesity: Study

Wide Waist with ‘normal Weight’ Bigger Risk than Obesity: Study


People of “normal” weight who sport a wide waist are more at risk of heart problems than obese people, said researchers Friday, urging a rethink of healthy weight guidelines.

How fat is distributed on a person’s frame determined disease risk as much as how much fat they had overall, according to an investigation of nearly 1,700 people aged 45 and over.

Even people who are not classified overweight on the Body Mass Index (BMI) scale, should be concerned if they had an “apple” shape with a waist wider than their hips, said research leader Jose Medina-Inojosa of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. > >> read more ...

‘Obesity Paradox’ Debunked: Fat Hikes Heart Risks, Study Confirms

‘Obesity Paradox’ Debunked: Fat Hikes Heart Risks, Study Confirms


The more overweight people become, the more likely they are to have a heart attack or stroke and to develop risk factors for heart disease like high blood pressure, a large UK study concludes.

Contrary to some past research suggesting there might be a heart-protective effect of being overweight or obese, the study team found the opposite, according to their report in the European Heart Journal.

Researchers examined data on more than 296,000 middle-aged men and women without heart disease, many of whom were overweight or obese based on their body mass index (BMI) – a ratio of weight to height. After an average follow-up of five years, 3.3 percent of the women and 5.7 percent of the men had a heart attack, stroke or other serious cardiovascular event. > >> read more ...

Obesity Can Cause Liver Damage by Age 8: Study

Obesity Can Cause Liver Damage by Age 8: Study


Obesity can lead to liver disease in kids as young as 8 years old, a new study warns.

The long-term study of 635 children in Massachusetts found that a bigger waist size at age 3 increases the odds that a child will have a marker for liver damage and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by age 8.

That marker is called ALT. By age 8, 23 percent of children studied had elevated blood levels of ALT. Those with a bigger waist size at age 3 and those with larger increases in obesity between ages 3 and 8 were more likely to have elevated ALT at age 8, the researchers found. > >> read more ...

Obesity Shifts Cancer to Younger Adults: Studies

Obesity Shifts Cancer to Younger Adults: Studies


Obesity has shifted certain cancers into younger age groups, say researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.  

The researchers investigated more than 100 studies to compile evidence showing how obesity increases cancer risk.

Currently, cancer is usually linked to adults over the age of 50, but the meta-analysis found that certain cancers are occurring more frequently in younger people, spurred by obesity.

In 2016, nearly 1 in 10 new breast cancer cases, and 1 in 4 new thyroid cancer cases were in young people aged 20-44. > >> read more ...

Obesity Tied to Shorter Life

Obesity Tied to Shorter Life


Obese people have shorter lives and even those who are just overweight spend more years living with heart disease than individuals who are a healthy weight, a U.S. study suggests.

Researchers examined data on more than 190,000 adults from 10 different studies conducted in the U.S. over the past seven decades that looked at weight and other factors that can influence the risk of heart disease. None of the participants had cardiovascular disease when they joined these studies, but at least 70 percent of men and about 60 percent of women aged 40 and older were overweight or obese. > >> read more ...

Bye-Bye Body Mass Index: 3 Obesity Tests Better Than the BMI

Bye-Bye Body Mass Index: 3 Obesity Tests Better Than the BMI


If you’re still using the BMI — body mass index — to determine if you’re dangerously overweight, you might as well be listening to music on an 8-track tape player or watching movies on an old VHS recorder.

That’s because the latest research shows that once-vaunted BMI is as outmoded as those old audio-video technologies and that other methods are far better at obesity-related risks for heart attack or other health problems.

A new study, published last month in the Journal of the American Heart Association, found that one newer type of obesity measurement — called a waist-to-hip ratio test — is a far better way to calculate excessive body fat than the BMI. > >> read more ...

Obesity Robs the Tongue of Taste Buds: Study

Obesity Robs the Tongue of Taste Buds: Study


Packing on pounds seems to dull people’s sense of taste, and puzzled researchers turned to mice to figure out why: Obesity, they found, can rob the tongue of taste buds.

If Tuesday’s findings pan out, “this could be a whole new kind of target in treating obesity,” said Cornell University food scientist Robin Dando, whose lab led the research. “People don’t really look at the taste bud, but it’s so fundamental.”

Diet, exercise and genetics are among many factors that play a role in obesity. But taste preferences influence dietary choices, and some earlier studies have suggested that obese people often taste flavors with less intensity than lean people. The theory, still unproven, is that people might make up for weakened taste by turning to higher-calorie foods or generally eating more. > >> read more ...

Breastfeeding Could Protect High-Birthweight Infants From Childhood Obesity: Study

Breastfeeding Could Protect High-Birthweight Infants From Childhood Obesity: Study


New South Korean research suggests that breastfeeding could have a protective effect against childhood obesity for high-birthweight infants, who are at a higher risk of developing the condition.

Researchers from Ewha Womans University College of Medicine in Seoul followed 38,039 babies from birth until the age of six.

The children were split in to one of three groups dependent on their birthweight. The low-birthweight group were born less than or equal to 2,500 grams; the normal-birthweight group, over 2,500 grams and under 4,000 grams; and the high-birthweight group, 4,000 grams or more. > >> read more ...