Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks

Being Annoyed About Noise Pollution Increases Heart Risks


New European research has found that exposure to annoying levels of noise could increase the risk of atrial fibrillation, a heart rhythm irregularity also known as heart flutter which can lead to stroke, heart failure, and other serious health conditions.

Carried out by researchers from the Department of Cardiology at the Mainz University Medical Center, Germany, the team looked at data taken from the Gutenberg Health Study (GHS), one of the largest studies of its kind which has already looked at the effects of noise pollution on health. > >> read more ...

The Benefits and Risks of Alcohol Consumption

The Benefits and Risks of Alcohol Consumption

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Alcohol has been a controversial topic for centuries. Although excessive drinking is clearly linked to risk of disease, accidents, and dependency, less evidence exists for moderate drinking. Indeed, some studies find that drinking small amounts of alcohol may actually provide some health benefits. This article discusses alcohol and explores its negative and positive health effects.

What Is Alcohol?

Alcohol, technically called ethanol, is produced by using yeast to ferment fruit, grain or sugar into a colorless liquid that interacts with your brain and nervous system. It’s often consumed when dining out, at parties, or in other social settings because it tends to make people feel less inhibited, more talkative, and relaxed. > >> read more ...

Oldest, Youngest Maternal Ages Show Highest Developmental Risks

Oldest, Youngest Maternal Ages Show Highest Developmental Risks


The youngest and oldest maternal ages show the highest risks of developmental vulnerability in children by the time they reach five years, new study showed.

Researchers at the University of New South Wales found that 21 percent of 100,000 children analyzed had at least one developmental vulnerability by the time they turned five, Health Day reported.

The highest rate was among children born to mothers who were 15 years or younger, a stunning 40 percent.

The lowest rate of 17 percent was among children born to mothers aged between 30 to 35 years, but then the number steadily climbed 24 percent among children born to mothers aged 35 to 45. > >> read more ...

Positioning During Radiation Key to Heart Risks: Study

Positioning During Radiation Key to Heart Risks: Study


If you have lung or throat cancer, exactly how you are positioned during your radiation treatments may alter your chances of beating the disease.

New research suggests that even tiny shifts can mean the radiation may harm organs around tumors in the chest, most notably the heart.

“We already know that using imaging can help us to target cancers much more precisely and make radiotherapy treatment more effective,” said researcher Corinne Johnson, a Ph.D. student at the Manchester Cancer Research Center in England. > >> read more ...

Exercise Reduces Heart Risks Regardless of Genes

Exercise Reduces Heart Risks Regardless of Genes


Staying physically fit can help ward off heart trouble, even if your genetics put you at higher risk for clogged arteries, a new, large study suggests.

The researchers looked at nearly 500,000 middle-aged and older adults and found those with higher fitness levels were less likely to develop heart disease over six years. And that was true even for people who carried gene variants that raise the odds of heart problems.

That does not mean exercise erases the effects of genes, the researchers added. But if you do have a genetic vulnerability to heart disease, you’re better off being physically fit. > >> read more ...

Coffee Warnings Overstate Cancer, Health Risks, Experts Say

Coffee Warnings Overstate Cancer, Health Risks, Experts Say


In case you missed it: A Los Angeles judge ruled last week that coffee shops such as Starbucks or Dunkin’ Donuts must warn customers that coffee contains acrylamide — suspected cancer-causing chemical that forms during bean roasting.

But the consensus of scientific experts says the controversial cancer warning overstates the risks. In fact, multiple medical studies have found that the health benefits of drinking coffee far outweigh any potential downsides.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer, the research arm of the World Health Organization, has repeatedly found no conclusive evidence that drinking coffee boosts cancer risk. In addition, the WHO removed coffee from the organizations list of cancer-causing agents in 2016. > >> read more ...

‘Obesity Paradox’ Debunked: Fat Hikes Heart Risks, Study Confirms

‘Obesity Paradox’ Debunked: Fat Hikes Heart Risks, Study Confirms


The more overweight people become, the more likely they are to have a heart attack or stroke and to develop risk factors for heart disease like high blood pressure, a large UK study concludes.

Contrary to some past research suggesting there might be a heart-protective effect of being overweight or obese, the study team found the opposite, according to their report in the European Heart Journal.

Researchers examined data on more than 296,000 middle-aged men and women without heart disease, many of whom were overweight or obese based on their body mass index (BMI) – a ratio of weight to height. After an average follow-up of five years, 3.3 percent of the women and 5.7 percent of the men had a heart attack, stroke or other serious cardiovascular event. > >> read more ...

Key Heart Risks Drop for Older Americans: Study

Key Heart Risks Drop for Older Americans: Study


Older Americans dramatically reduced their risks for heart attack and stroke over a recent 20-year period, a new analysis finds.

The likely reason: greater use of drugs to control cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as a decline in smoking, according to researchers from the University of Southern California.

The benefits were seen in both sexes, which suggests women are now getting medical care equal to men, the study authors noted.

“We used to think men had a higher cardiovascular risk than women,” said senior researcher Eileen Crimmins, a professor of gerontology. “But now we see everybody has gotten better. Cardiovascular risk has improved and that’s a big plus.” > >> read more ...

Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks

Childhood Cancer Survivors Face Higher Heart Risks


Adult survivors of childhood cancer have a greater risk of heart disease and develop risk factors like high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol earlier in life compared to the general population, a German study suggests.

Researchers studied 951 adults, ages 23 to 48, who had been diagnosed with cancer when they were less than 15 years old. The study team looked at lab tests for risk factors for heart disease, and also for conditions like heart failure, stroke and heart attacks. Along with the cancer survivors, they studied more than 15,000 similar people who didn’t have malignancies as children. > >> read more ...

Low Sperm Count May Indicate Serious Health Risks: Study

Low Sperm Count May Indicate Serious Health Risks: Study


A low sperm count may do more than affect a man’s ability to have children. It also may be linked to a number of health problems, new research suggests.

A study of nearly 5,200 Italian men found that those with low sperm counts were 1.2 times more likely to have more body fat, higher blood pressure, higher bad cholesterol and triglycerides, and lower levels of good cholesterol.

Men with low sperm counts also had higher rates of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of these and other risk factors that boost the odds of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. They also had higher rates of insulin resistance, which can lead to diabetes. > >> read more ...