Poll Finds Sex Still Important to Many Seniors

Poll Finds Sex Still Important to Many Seniors


If you think seniors abandon their sex lives as the physical woes of aging descend upon them, a new survey suggests otherwise.

The reality is that 40 percent of older Americans still have sex, while 54 percent of older couples still do it, according to a new poll from the University of Michigan.

Even more couples — 61 percent — say that sex matters for their quality of life. Luckily, 73 percent of those aged 65 to 80 are satisfied with their sex lives.

To older folks, those numbers might not sound so surprising, said Erica Solway, co-associate director of the university’s National Poll on Healthy Aging, published May 3. But, she added, the results might be eye-opening to younger people who think aging spells the end of romance. > >> read more ...

Physically Fit Seniors Have Better Language Skills: Study

Physically Fit Seniors Have Better Language Skills: Study


Older adults who exercise regularly may have an easier time finding words to express themselves than their peers who aren’t as physically fit, a small study suggests.
Researchers examined results from 28 volunteers, mostly in their late 60s or early 70s, who played word games on a computer and performed aerobic fitness tests on an exercise bike. They also studied a control group of young adults in their early 20s who completed just the language evaluations.

For the word games, participants were asked to name famous people such as authors, actors, and politicians based on 20 questions. They were also given definitions of 20 words rarely used in daily conversation as well as 20 very common words and asked whether they knew the word relating to the definition. > >> read more ...

Seniors Stick to Workouts Better if Exercising With Contemporaries: Study

Seniors Stick to Workouts Better if Exercising With Contemporaries: Study


New Canadian research has found that older adults are more likely to stick to a fitness plan when they can work out with people of a similar age.

Carried out by researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) the study looked at 627 adults with an average age of 72 and enrolled them in a 12-week exercise program at YMCA locations in Metro Vancouver, with the option of extending for another 12 weeks afterwards.

Participants were divided into three workout groups; one group included participants similar in age and the same gender, another included participants similar in age but mixed gender, and the third included a mix of age and gender. > >> read more ...

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Pneumonia in Seniors: Study

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Pneumonia in Seniors: Study


Common medications used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers increase the risk of pneumonia in older people, says a study from the U.K.’s University of Exeter Medical School. These medications are protein-pump inhibitors, or PPIs, and include the popular drugs Prilosec, Nexium, and Prevacid.

According to experts, approximately 40 percent of older adults receive PPIs, although up to 85 percent of people who receive them as prescriptions — PPIs are also sold without a prescription — may not need them. > >> read more ...

Opioids Raise Risk of Falling in Seniors

Opioids Raise Risk of Falling in Seniors


Elderly people who are prescribed opioids may be at higher risk for injuries from falls, some of which may be fatal, a Canadian analysis of trauma cases suggests.
Researchers studied more than 67,000 injured patients over age 65 who were admitted to trauma centers in Quebec between 2004 and 2014. The average age was 81.

Overall, people with a recent opioid prescription were 2.4 times more likely to have been injured in a fall than other trauma patients, the study found.

And among all patients with fall-related injuries, those with recent opioid prescriptions were 58 percent more likely to die in the hospital than patients who were not using these painkillers. > >> read more ...

Exercise, Not Vitamins, Prevents Falls in Seniors, Say Experts

Exercise, Not Vitamins, Prevents Falls in Seniors, Say Experts


Falling is the leading cause of injury-related death among people over age 65, and seniors who want to avoid falls should exercise, not rely on supplements like vitamin D, US guidelines said Tuesday.

The new recommendations from the US Preventive Services Task Force update those last issued in 2012, when the independent medical advisory group was favorable to taking supplements containing vitamin D as a way of preventing fall-related injury.

But unless a person has vitamin D deficiency or a frail bone condition known as osteoporosis, the task force’s latest review of clinical trials on the topic found no benefit for average seniors, and even an increased risk of kidney stones for those who take vitamin D and calcium supplements. > >> read more ...

Dancing Makes Seniors Happier | Newsmax.com

Dancing Makes Seniors Happier | Newsmax.com


Seniors can improve their energy, flexibility, posture, and achieve a sense of achievement by dancing. Researchers at Australia’s Queensland University of Technology and Queensland Ballet also found dancers were happier and had a stronger sense of community and friendship.

The three-month project examined the effects ballet had on the health and well-being of older Australians.

“We weren’t surprised by the research findings strongly indicating that ballet participation is considered to be a highly pleasurable activity for active older adults,” said Felicity Mandile of Queensland Ballet. However, she was surprised by some of the health effects produced by dancing. > >> read more ...

Daytime Sleepiness in Seniors May Indicate Impending Alzheimer’s

Daytime Sleepiness in Seniors May Indicate Impending Alzheimer’s


Older adults who are sleepy during the day might have harmful plaque building in their brain that is a sign of impending Alzheimer’s disease, researchers report.

A hallmark of Alzheimer’s is the accumulation of a protein in the brain called beta-amyloid. It’s believed that one benefit of sleep is to clear beta-amyloid, and poor sleep might allow it to build up, the authors of the new study pointed out.

“Elderly individuals with excessive daytime sleepiness may be more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease-related changes,” said corresponding author Prashanthi Vemuri, an associate professor of radiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. > >> read more ...

Sensors Help Smartphones Monitor Solo Seniors

Sensors Help Smartphones Monitor Solo Seniors


Looking after an elderly relative who lives alone can be a huge source of worry. But what if your smartphone could automatically alert you if your mother has stayed in bed all morning or suffered a fall?

Small sensors that monitor home activity and can send alerts to smartphones are marking it easier to keep an eye on seniors from a distance, helping them to live independently for longer instead of going to a nursing home.

The products on display at the Mobile World Congress, the world’s largest mobile phone fair in Barcelona, are part of the rapidly growing elderly care tech industry. > >> read more ...

Delirium Common After Surgery in Frail Seniors

Delirium Common After Surgery in Frail Seniors


Older adults who have elective surgery are more likely to experience delirium afterwards when they’re frail, a research review suggests.

Researchers examined data from 41 previously published studies with a total of 9,384 patients age 60 or older who had elective surgery. Overall, about one in six patients experienced symptoms of delirium like confusion, paranoia and aggression after their operations.

Patients who suffered from frailty were roughly four times more likely to develop delirium than others in the studies. > >> read more ...