Study Finds Depression May Dull Memory

Study Finds Depression May Dull Memory


Depression may do more than darken your mood, with new research suggesting it might also sap your memory.

“Since symptoms of depression can be treated, it may be possible that treatment may also reduce thinking and memory problems,” said study author Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, from the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine.

The scientists also found that the brain structure of seniors with more severe symptoms of depression differed from those without depression. > >> read more ...

Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study

Hearing Aids Linked to Less Hospitalization: Study


Older adults with hearing loss are less likely to be hospitalized or to visit the emergency room when they wear hearing aids, compared to those who don’t, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers examined Medicare payment data collected in 2013 and 2014 for 1,336 adults 65 and older with hearing loss. Overall, 734 people, or 55 percent, didn’t wear hearing aids.

During the study period, 24 percent of people with hearing aids and 26 percent of those without the devices visited an emergency room at least once, the study found. With hearing aids, 20 percent of people were hospitalized, compared to 22 percent without the devices. > >> read more ...

Glass of Red Wine Protects Against Prostate Cancer: Study

Glass of Red Wine Protects Against Prostate Cancer: Study


Moderate red wine consumption does not significantly increase the risk of prostate cancer according to new research, and in fact could have a slight protective effect.

Carried out by an international research team led by Shahrokh Shariat at the Medical University of Vienna in Austria, the new meta-analysis looked at whether moderate wine consumption had an effect on the risk of developing prostate cancer, the most common form of cancer in the Western world. 

Fifteen to 20 percent of men are affected by prostate cancer at some time in their lives and 2.6 percent die from the disease.  > >> read more ...

Kids Exposed to Smoke Have More ER Visits: Study

Kids Exposed to Smoke Have More ER Visits: Study


New US research suggests that exposing children to a combination of secondhand tobacco and marijuana smoke could increase their risk of otitis media (an infection in the middle ear that causes inflammation and a buildup of fluid behind the eardrum) and increase the number of visits to the emergency department (ED).

Carried out by Dr. Adam Johnson at Wake Forest University Baptist Health and Dr. Rakesh D.Mistry at the University of Colorado, the study set out to assess if there was a link between secondhand smoke from marijuana and the number of ED visits among children, as well as the rates of tobacco sensitive conditions including asthma, otitis media and viral respiratory infections. > >> read more ...

Duped Patients Crowdfund for Bogus Medical Care: Study

Duped Patients Crowdfund for Bogus Medical Care: Study


They’re the tech-age version of donor jars at the diner: crowdfunding websites that aim to link ailing people with strangers willing to help pay for medical treatment. But new research suggests duped patients sometimes crowdfund to pay for bogus stem cell treatments.

A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association focused on for-profit clinics that use direct-to-consumer advertising for costly unproven stem-cell treatments for conditions including chronic lung disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis and arthritis. Treatments are often marketed as cures or with a promise for vastly improved health. > >> read more ...

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study

Even Mild Concussions Linked to Dementia Risk: Study


Concussions, even those that are mild, more than double the risk for developing dementia down the road, new research suggests.

The findings stem from an analysis that tracked concussions and dementia risk among nearly 360,000 military veterans.

Study author Deborah Barnes noted that many of the younger vets in the study had experienced concussions while in combat, often in Iraq and Afghanistan. Head blows among older vets were often due to falls or car accidents.

“Results were similar in the two groups,” she said, “so we don’t think there is anything special about these head injuries.” That makes it more likely that the dementia risk seen among military personnel would also apply to the general population. > >> read more ...

Healthy Diet Can Protect Against Diabetes: Harvard Study

Healthy Diet Can Protect Against Diabetes: Harvard Study


Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, but you can protect yourself with a healthier diet. And the same type of diet can help you manage diabetes if you already have it.

According to experts at Boston’s Joslin Diabetes Center and the Harvard School of Public Health, specific foods that help reduce your risk include green leafy vegetables, oat cereal, yogurt and dairy products, grapes, apples, blueberries and walnuts. Surprisingly, coffee and decaf java are also on the list. > >> read more ...

Surgeons’ Skills Increase With Age, Says Study

Surgeons’ Skills Increase With Age, Says Study


Surgeons’ skills may improve with age, and male and female surgeons perform equally well, a recent U.S. study finds.
Medicare patients’ risk of dying in the month after an operation steadily fell as their surgeon’s age increased, Dr. Yusuke Tsugawa of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA in Los Angeles and colleagues report in The BMJ.

There was little difference between mortality among patients of male or female doctors, with one exception. “Patients treated by female surgeons in their 50s had the lowest mortality across all groups,” Tsugawa told Reuters Health in a telephone interview. > >> read more ...

Daily Aspirin Linked to Deadly Skin Cancer in Men: Study

Daily Aspirin Linked to Deadly Skin Cancer in Men: Study


New US research has found a link between taking a daily aspirin and a higher risk of melanoma in men, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.

Carried out by researchers at Northwestern University, the study looked at medical records from 195,140 patients aged 18-89, who had no prior history of melanoma.

From this base, 1,187 of the patients were aspirin exposed, with the researchers only including patients who had been taking aspirin daily for at least one year at a dose of 81 or 325 mg. > >> read more ...

Bad Diet Curbs Fertility: Study

Bad Diet Curbs Fertility: Study


Women who shun fruit or eat lots of fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study released Thursday.

A nearly no-fruit diet compared to one loaded with three or more pieces per day added about two weeks, on average, to the time of conception, researchers reported in the peer-reviewed journal Human Reproduction.

And women who consumed fast foods such as burgers, pizza and deep-fried chicken four or more times a week compared to those who never or rarely touched the stuff took an extra month to become pregnant. > >> read more ...