Opioids Still Overprescribed Following Surgery: Mayo Clinic

Opioids Still Overprescribed Following Surgery: Mayo Clinic


Doctors continue to prescribe far too many opioid painkillers to patients following surgery, a new study indicates.

In fact, one of every three patients prescribed an opioid, such as Oxycontin, didn’t take a single pill during their recuperation, said lead researcher Elizabeth Habermann. She is scientific director for surgical outcomes at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

“Their entire prescription amount went unused,” Habermann said. “That showed us there’s an opportunity to prescribe a certain select group of patients zero opioids, and they may be able to take care of their pain with acetaminophen [Tylenol] or NSAIDs alone.” NSAIDs are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as Motrin or Advil. > >> read more ...

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Back, but Not 100% Back After Heart Surgery

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s Back, but Not 100% Back After Heart Surgery


Arnold Schwarzenegger still isn’t back 100 percent following heart surgery, but the 70-year-old action star and former California governor said in a video tweet on Thursday that he’s feeling better.

Schwarzenegger thanked fans for their support and detailed his recovery after the March 29 operation at Cedars Sinai hospital in Los Angeles, per USA Today.

Thank you all for caring. We are moving forward! pic.twitter.com/kvauldg3Mq
— Arnold (@Schwarzenegger) April 12, 2018 > >> read more ...

Study: Breast Cancer Surgery Healing Process May Cause It to Spread

Study: Breast Cancer Surgery Healing Process May Cause It to Spread


The wound healing process after breast cancer surgery may cause the cancer to spread, a new study published Wednesday suggests.

The study in Science Translational Medicine found that as the immune system works to heal the scar from surgery, it is diverted away from stopping the growth and multiplication of cancer cells that have wandered from the tumor site.

The study authors suggested this may be why cancers commonly spread and recur in the first 18 months after surgery.   > >> read more ...

Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Increased Divorces and Marriages

Weight-Loss Surgery Linked to Increased Divorces and Marriages


Weight loss surgery can affect interpersonal relationships, a Swedish report suggests.

Researchers found that compared to people who didn’t have so-called bariatric surgery, those who did were more likely to become separated or divorced, if they were married, and more likely to get into a new relationship or get married, if they had been single.

The effects of weight-loss surgery extend beyond just losing pounds or kilos, coauthor Per-Arne Svensson of Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg told Reuters Health by phone. > >> read more ...

Arnold Schwarzenegger Says ‘I’m Back’ After Heart Surgery

Arnold Schwarzenegger Says ‘I’m Back’ After Heart Surgery


Arnold Schwarzenegger is in good spirits as he recovers from heart surgery in a Los Angeles hospital.

The 70-year-old “Terminator” actor and former California governor underwent a scheduled procedure to replace a valve on Thursday. His spokesman Daniel Ketchell says he played with one of his old action movie catchphrases when he regained consciousness and announced, “I’m back.”

Ketchell said in an email Schwarzenegger “continues to be doing very well, in good spirits, and recovering.” > >> read more ...

Schwarzenegger Undergoes Emergency Open-Heart Surgery: TMZ

Schwarzenegger Undergoes Emergency Open-Heart Surgery: TMZ


Hollywood action star Arnold Schwarzenegger is in a stable condition after undergoing emergency open-heart surgery, celebrity news website TMZ reported Friday.

The 70-year-old actor turned activist was in a Los Angeles hospital Thursday to have a catheter valve replaced and developed complications, the gossip portal said, citing unnamed Schwarzenegger sources.

Doctors rushed the “Terminator” and “Predator” star into theater for open-heart surgery, operating for several hours, TMZ said. > >> read more ...

Spinal Surgery Doesn’t Cut Painkiller Use

Spinal Surgery Doesn’t Cut Painkiller Use


Most patients who take prescription opioids for chronic pain before lumbar fusion surgery continue taking them long-term after surgery, a new study suggests.

More than 77 percent continued long-term postoperative use, and 14 percent had occasional use, the study authors wrote in the journal PAIN.

“The important message here is that patients go into surgery thinking it will eliminate their need to take pain medication. But for this type of surgery, it’s unlikely that patients will end up stopping opioids,” lead author Dr. Richard Deyo of Oregon Health and Science University in Portland told Reuters Health by phone. > >> read more ...

Fixing Bad Knees Without Surgery?

Fixing Bad Knees Without Surgery?


Tiny pellets could treat arthritic knee pain, delaying the need for knee replacement surgery, a small study has found. Microparticles inserted into small blood vessels around the knee helped reduce the pain and improve function in eight arthritis sufferers, according to…

Glowing Dyes Spot Hidden Cancers During Surgery

Glowing Dyes Spot Hidden Cancers During Surgery


It was an ordinary surgery to remove a tumor — until doctors turned off the lights and the patient’s chest started to glow. A spot over his heart shined purplish pink. Another shimmered in a lung.

They were hidden cancers revealed by fluorescent dye, an advance that soon may transform how hundreds of thousands of operations are done each year.

Surgery has long been the best way to cure cancer. If the disease recurs, it’s usually because stray tumor cells were left behind or others lurked undetected. Yet there’s no good way for surgeons to tell what is cancer and what is not. They look and feel for defects, but good and bad tissue often seem the same. > >> read more ...

Is Bariatric Surgery the Answer for You?

Is Bariatric Surgery the Answer for You?


If you’ve been struggling with your weight for some time, you might be wondering if bariatric surgery is the answer.

This surgery, which involves reducing the size of your stomach to limit how much food you can take in, isn’t for moderate weight loss. You need to be at least 100 pounds overweight with a BMI of 40, or 35 if you also have serious health issues. You’ll also need to show that you haven’t been able to lose weight with other, more conventional approaches. > >> read more ...