Colon Cancer Survival Tied to More Activity, Healthier Diet: Study

Colon Cancer Survival Tied to More Activity, Healthier Diet: Study


Colon cancer survivors with healthier lifestyles may live longer, a recent U.S. study suggests.
“Colon cancer patients who followed the American Cancer Society guidelines on nutrition and physical activity had a marked reduction in risk of death and recurrence,” lead author Erin Van Blarigan of the University of California at San Francisco said in a telephone interview.

“The magnitude of benefit was on par with what you might expect from an invasive treatment, if not larger.” > >> read more ...

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds

Immune Therapy Boosts Lung Cancer Survival Rates, Study Finds


Immune therapy improved lung cancer survival rates in a new study of those recently diagnosed with the disease in the biggest win so far for the treatment, which has had much of its success until now in less common cancers.

In the study, Merck’s Keytruda, given with standard chemotherapy, cut in half the risk of dying or having the cancer worsen, compared to chemo alone after nearly one year, according to The Associated Press. The results are expected to quickly set a new standard of care for about 70,000 patients each year in the United States whose lung cancer has already spread by the time it’s found. > >> read more ...

Belly Fat Lowers Kidney Cancer Survival in Women: Study

Belly Fat Lowers Kidney Cancer Survival in Women: Study


Belly fat reduces a woman’s chances for surviving kidney cancer, but not a man’s, a new study suggests.

The study included 77 women and 145 men with kidney cancer. Half of the women with high amounts of belly fat died within 3.5 years of diagnosis. Meanwhile, more than half of women with low amounts of belly fat were still alive after 10 years.

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found no link between belly fat and men’s kidney cancer survival. > >> read more ...

Immunotherapy Cocktail Boosts Lung Cancer Survival

Immunotherapy Cocktail Boosts Lung Cancer Survival


Roche’s Tecentriq immunotherapy combined with other drugs boosted lung cancer patients’ survival versus an older cocktail, the Swiss company said as it seeks an edge on Merck and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

Mixing Tecentriq with Avastin and carboplatin and paclitaxel boosted overall survival in first-line treatment of non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Roche said on Monday, compared to patients who received only Avastin plus the two chemotherapies.

The latest trial success follows Roche’s announcement last week about a separate study in which Tecentriq mixed with chemotherapies carboplatin and Abraxane boosted progression-free survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer. > >> read more ...

7 Survival Myths That Could Get You Killed

7 Survival Myths That Could Get You Killed


With the advent of the Internet, everyone is an expert when it comes to everything from medicine to outward bound survival skills. Unfortunately, modern lore spread through the Web and pop culture can actually get you killed.

That’s particularly true when it comes to survival strategies hawked by less-than-expert Web posters.

You’ve heard the one about drinking alcohol to warm up in a blizzard? How about cutting a snake-bite wound and sucking out the poison? Or playing dead, if you’re attacked by a bear? Turns out they’re all falsehoods that could get you killed. > >> read more ...

CPR Survival Rates Are Lower Than You Might Think

CPR Survival Rates Are Lower Than You Might Think


The majority of people believe cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is successful more often than it tends to be in reality, according to a small U.S. study.

This overly optimistic view, which may partly stem from seeing happy outcomes in television medical dramas, can get in the way of decision-making and frank conversations about end of life care with doctors, the research team writes in American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

CPR is intended to restart a heart that has stopped beating, known as cardiac arrest, which is typically caused by an electrical disturbance in the heart muscle. Although a heart attack is not the same thing – it occurs when blood flow to the heart is partly or completely blocked, often by a clot – a heart attack can also cause the heart to stop beating. > >> read more ...

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