Scientists Develop More Accurate Peanut Allergy Test

Scientists Develop More Accurate Peanut Allergy Test


British scientists have developed a far more accurate blood test to diagnose peanut allergy, offering a better way to monitor a significant food hazard.
Peanuts are the most common cause of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis, or severe allergic reaction, and allergy cases among children have risen sharply in recent years. Britain’s Food Standards Agency estimates up to one in 55 children have a peanut allergy.

In contrast to existing skin-prick and other blood tests that produce a large number of false positive results, the new diagnostic has 98 percent specificity, researchers from the Medical Research Council (MARC) reported on Thursday. > >> read more ...

Cheap, Portable Test Spots Measles Risk

Cheap, Portable Test Spots Measles Risk


A cheap, portable device can warn of a person’s vulnerability to infectious diseases like measles, which kills tens of thousands of people each year, mainly in developing countries, researchers said Wednesday.

The test, called the Measles-Rubella Box (MR Box), uses a finger-prick volume of blood to detect the presence of antibodies against measles and rubella in only 35 minutes.

Measles kills about 134,000 children per year, and rubella causes some 100,000 children to be born with birth defects such as deafness. > >> read more ...

Could New Test Determine Best Treatment for Sinusitis?

Could New Test Determine Best Treatment for Sinusitis?


Nasal mucus could provide important clues about chronic sinusitis, researchers say.

Chronic sinusitis, a common condition, occurs when the sinuses are swollen for more than three months. Analyzing mucus from the nose of someone with chronic sinusitis could help doctors determine whether surgery or medication is the best treatment for that patient, according to the researchers.

In this study, researchers from Vanderbilt University in Nashville collected and analyzed nasal mucus from patients with chronic sinusitis. The mucus was analyzed for cytokines, which are proteins that enable cells to talk to each other. Based on the cytokines findings, the researchers categorized the patients into six different groups. > >> read more ...

Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans

Japan to Trial Urine Test to Spot Cancer in Humans


A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world’s first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.

Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.

It will now begin testing the method using some 250 urine samples, to see if samples at room temperature are suitable for analysis, Hitachi spokesman Chiharu Odaira told AFP. > >> read more ...

New Blood Test Detects Alzheimer’s Risk Before Symptoms Appear

New Blood Test Detects Alzheimer’s Risk Before Symptoms Appear


Alzheimer’s disease has no cure, and drug treatments offer minimal help. Many experts believe that progress in drug research is hindered by the fact that although the disease is thought to begin long before symptoms become obvious, it can’t be diagnosed until the disease has progressed. An earlier diagnosis might provide time for an effective intervention.

German scientists have developed a blood test for Alzheimer’s long before symptoms, like memory loss, appear. > >> read more ...

Parents’ Fertility Doc Is Woman’s Father, Ancestry.com DNA Test Reveals

Parents’ Fertility Doc Is Woman’s Father, Ancestry.com DNA Test Reveals


An Ancestry.com DNA test last year revealed to a woman that her parent’s fertility doctor is actually her father, The Washington Post reported on Tuesday in connection with a lawsuit the woman has filed.

Kelli Rowlette filed the federal lawsuit in Idaho last week against now retired obstetrician gynecologist Gerald E. Mortimer, accusing him of fraud and medical negligence, the Post said.

Rowlette didn’t know her mother Sally Ashby was artificially inseminated to conceive her in the early 1980s – supposedly with the sperm of her husband at the time, Howard Fowler, in a mixture with the sperm of an anonymous donor who was supposed to match the couple’s specifications, the Post said. > >> read more ...

Better Than Colonoscopy: New Blood Test Identifies Colorectal Cancer

Better Than Colonoscopy: New Blood Test Identifies Colorectal Cancer


A new blood test that screens for colorectal cancer has been found to be nearly as effective as colonoscopy and better than some standard methods at diagnosing the life-threatening condition.

A new study of the test, unveiled at the recent 2018 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, found that it can identify signs of colorectal cancer at its earliest — or even in precancerous — stages, when it can be most effectively treated.

The blood test — a type of “liquid biopsy” — can be administered by a healthcare professional, who collects a routine sample of blood that is then analyzed to see if there are circulating colorectal tumor cells. > >> read more ...

Prenatal Test May Spot Serious Gene Mutations: Study

Prenatal Test May Spot Serious Gene Mutations: Study


Scientists who found a way to use amniotic fluid to sequence the entire genome of a fetus say the breakthrough could significantly increase detection of genetic conditions during pregnancy.

Researchers tweaked a common prenatal test called amniocentesis. In that procedure, amniotic fluid is taken from a pregnant woman’s uterus and analyzed for abnormalities in the fetus.

Currently, amniocentesis can diagnose conditions such as Down syndrome and cystic fibrosis, but cannot detect most disease-causing genetic mutations. > >> read more ...

Pin-Prick Blood Test Spots Deadly Sepsis: Study

Pin-Prick Blood Test Spots Deadly Sepsis: Study


Scientists on Monday unveiled a quick, cheap way to detect sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which the body is attacked by its own immune system.

In clinical trials at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, the researchers — analysing a single drop of blood with a thumb-size filtering device — singled out sepsis patients in a matter of hours with 95 percent accuracy.

Currently, nearly a third of sepsis patients are misdiagnosed with devices that can take days to yield results. > >> read more ...

Daily Dose of Viagra May Reduce Colon Cancer Risk: Test

Daily Dose of Viagra May Reduce Colon Cancer Risk: Test


A small daily dose of Viagra reduces the risk of colorectal cancer in mice genetically modified to have the disease. Viagra reduced the formation of polyps by 50 percent, according to a study performed at Augusta University’s Medical College of Georgia.

Polyps are abnormal clumps of cells on the lining of the intestines that may become cancer. Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.

While Viagra is primarily thought of as a drug to treat erectile dysfunction, it has been safely used for years to treat a variety of conditions, including pulmonary hypertension and problems related to premature birth, in a wide range of doses and age groups. > >> read more ...