23andMe Gets OK to Sell Breast Cancer Gene Test

23andMe Gets OK to Sell Breast Cancer Gene Test


The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday allowed genetic testing company 23andMe to market directly to consumers its test that will help assess three mutations in a common type of breast cancer gene.

The drug regulator said the test, which work by analyzing DNA collected from saliva samples, provides genetic risk information but cannot determine a person’s overall risk of developing a disease or condition.

The test detects only three out of more than 1,000 known BRCA mutations and are not the most common ones in the general population, the drug regulator said. > >> read more ...

Urine Test May Reveal Body’s True Age: Study

Urine Test May Reveal Body’s True Age: Study


A simple urine test apparently can reveal how old your body really is — showing its biological, not chronological age.

That information can then help determine your risk for age-related diseases and even death, a new study suggests.

The test checks for a substance — called a marker — that indicates cellular damage from a process known as oxidation. The substance increases in urine as people get older.

“As we age, we suffer increasing oxidative damage, and so the levels of oxidative markers increase in our body,” explained study co-author Jian-Ping Cai, a researcher at the National Center of Gerontology at Beijing Hospital in China. > >> read more ...

Feds OK First Blood Test to Diagnose Brain Injuries

Feds OK First Blood Test to Diagnose Brain Injuries


The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won U.S. government approval.

The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry’s race to find a way to diagnose concussions.

The test doesn’t detect concussions and the approval won’t immediately change how patients with suspected concussions or other brain trauma are treated. But Wednesday’s green light by the Food and Drug Administration “is a big deal because then it opens the door and accelerates technology,” said Michael McCrea, a brain injury expert at Medical College of Wisconsin. > >> read more ...