Research Finds Family History Tied to Childhood Obesity

Research Finds Family History Tied to Childhood Obesity


New European research has revealed that a family history of health conditions such as obesity and high blood pressure could be key risk factors for the development of childhood obesity. 

Carried out by the University of Messina, Italy, the study set out to investigate if a family history of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases could influence the onset and severity of childhood obesity.

The researchers looked at 260 overweight and obese children aged between two and 17 years old and carried out a medical assessment on each participant. > >> read more ...

Healthy, Smoke-Free Lifestyle Tied to at Least an Extra Decade of Life

Healthy, Smoke-Free Lifestyle Tied to at Least an Extra Decade of Life


Adults who follow a healthy lifestyle in middle age may extend their lifespan by more than a decade and have a lower risk of dying from cancer or heart disease, a U.S. study suggests.
Researchers focused on five habits long linked to a lower risk of developing or dying from variety of chronic medical problems: not smoking, limiting alcohol, exercising, eating well, and maintaining a healthy weight.

During more than three decades of follow-up, people who followed all five of these habits were 74 percent less likely to die from all causes, 82 percent less likely to die from heart disease and 65 percent less likely to die from cancer. > >> read more ...

Air Pollution Tied to IVF Failure

Air Pollution Tied to IVF Failure


Women exposed to high levels of air pollution may have less success getting pregnant with fertility treatments or staying pregnant, compared to women breathing cleaner air, a South Korean study suggests.
Researchers analyzed pregnancy rates over nine years and more than 6,600 IVF cycles at a Seoul fertility clinic and found reduced conception rates and increased pregnancy losses among women exposed to the highest levels of five types of air pollution.

“Although the specific mechanism is unclear, high ambient air pollution has been suggested to affect processes of conception assisted by in vitro fertilization (IVF), which means the impact of air pollution can be profound in couples who are suffering from infertility,” said lead author Dr. Seung-Ah Choe of the School of Medicine at CHA University and the CHA fertility clinic in Seoul. > >> read more ...

Some Antidepressants Tied to Dementia: Study

Some Antidepressants Tied to Dementia: Study


Long-term use of certain anti-depressants have been linked to dementia in a large British study, researchers said Thursday, though they could not definitively conclude that the drugs were the cause.

The study in more than 300,000 people in Britain found that those diagnosed with dementia were almost a third more likely to have been prescribed so-called anticholinergic medicines to treat depression and certain bladder conditions between four and 20 years earlier.

“What we don’t know for sure is whether the medication is the cause” of the dementia, said George Savva from the University of East Anglia’s School of Health Science. He had co-authored the study in the BMJ medical journal. > >> read more ...

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Pneumonia in Seniors: Study

Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Pneumonia in Seniors: Study


Common medications used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers increase the risk of pneumonia in older people, says a study from the U.K.’s University of Exeter Medical School. These medications are protein-pump inhibitors, or PPIs, and include the popular drugs Prilosec, Nexium, and Prevacid.

According to experts, approximately 40 percent of older adults receive PPIs, although up to 85 percent of people who receive them as prescriptions — PPIs are also sold without a prescription — may not need them. > >> read more ...

Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study

Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study


People who are deficient in vitamin D have a five-fold increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University.

Our bodies make vitamin D, often called the “sunshine vitamin,” when the skin is exposed to sunlight. But many Americans are deficient in vitamin D, and others live on the brink of deficiency even in the sunniest of months. Studies have linked low vitamin D levels with compromised immune systems, heart disease, and a host of other ailments. > >> read more ...

Losing a Spouse Tied to Cognitive Decline: Study

Losing a Spouse Tied to Cognitive Decline: Study


Older adults who lose a spouse may be more vulnerable to cognitive decline in subsequent years and require extra support and monitoring, researchers say.

In the study of nearly 7,000 middle aged and older men and women, cognitive functioning declined over time for everyone, but it degraded slightly more and slightly faster for those who had been widowed, regardless of whether they remarried.

At the same time, having a high level of education or at least one living sibling appeared to protect against the decline associated with widowhood, the study team reports in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. > >> read more ...

Tooth Loss in Middle Age Tied to Heart Disease: Study

Tooth Loss in Middle Age Tied to Heart Disease: Study


Losing two or more natural teeth in middle age may signal an increased risk for coronary heart disease, a U.S. study suggests.
“In addition to other established associations between dental health and risk of disease, our findings suggest that middle-aged adults who have lost two or more teeth in recent past could be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease,” Dr. Lu Qi of Tulane University in New Orleans said in a statement. “That’s regardless of the number of natural teeth a person has as a middle-aged adult, or whether they have traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as poor diet or high blood pressure.” > >> read more ...

Colon Cancer Survival Tied to More Activity, Healthier Diet: Study

Colon Cancer Survival Tied to More Activity, Healthier Diet: Study


Colon cancer survivors with healthier lifestyles may live longer, a recent U.S. study suggests.
“Colon cancer patients who followed the American Cancer Society guidelines on nutrition and physical activity had a marked reduction in risk of death and recurrence,” lead author Erin Van Blarigan of the University of California at San Francisco said in a telephone interview.

“The magnitude of benefit was on par with what you might expect from an invasive treatment, if not larger.” > >> read more ...

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware

Poor Air Quality Tied to Spike in Heart, Lung Problems but Patients Unaware


Poor air quality with high levels of tiny pollution particles known as PM 2.5 are tied to a spike in emergency department visits for heart- and lung-related illnesses and stroke, a California study suggests, but a nationwide U.S. survey finds that few heart patients are aware of air quality risks.

Based on analysis of areas affected by the intense 2015 California wildfire season, researchers found that within a day of residents being exposed to dense smoke, emergency room visits for heart attacks and other cardiac events and symptoms rose by 15 percent overall, and 42 percent among people over age 65. > >> read more ...