Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study

Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Diabetes: Study


People who are deficient in vitamin D have a five-fold increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University.

Our bodies make vitamin D, often called the “sunshine vitamin,” when the skin is exposed to sunlight. But many Americans are deficient in vitamin D, and others live on the brink of deficiency even in the sunniest of months. Studies have linked low vitamin D levels with compromised immune systems, heart disease, and a host of other ailments. > >> read more ...

Low Vitamin D Could Increase Diabetes Risk in Postmenopausal Women

Low Vitamin D Could Increase Diabetes Risk in Postmenopausal Women


New research from Brazil has found that an insufficient level of vitamin D could be increasing the risk of metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

Described as a collection of conditions that increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS) is estimated to affect around 50% of the female population above the age of 50 in the United States. The risk of developing MetS increases with age, although making healthy lifestyle choices can help control it. > >> read more ...

Vitamin D Tied to Lower Cancer Risk: Study

Vitamin D Tied to Lower Cancer Risk: Study


Higher levels of Vitamin D in the blood may be linked to a lower risk of developing certain cancers, a study in Japanese adults reported Thursday.

“These findings support the hypothesis that Vitamin D has protective effects against cancers at many sites,” researchers reported in a study published in The BMJ medical journal.

Vitamin D is made by the skin in response to sunlight. By maintaining calcium levels in the body, it helps keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy. > >> read more ...

Vitamin D Can Reduce Mortality: Study

Vitamin D Can Reduce Mortality: Study


A new Norwegian study suggests that getting the right amount of vitamin D could substantially reduce an individual’s risk of death.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Bergen (UiB), the study looked at 4,114 patients with cardiovascular diseases to assess the possible link between their vitamin D levels and risk of death from cardiovascular disease and all causes.

Participants had an average age of 62 at the start of the study and were followed for a period of 12 years. > >> read more ...

Vitamin A in Cattle Feed May Protect Against Milk Allergy: Study

Vitamin A in Cattle Feed May Protect Against Milk Allergy: Study


The vitamin A added to cattle feed may protect against milk allergies, says a study from Vienna’s University of Veterinary Medicine.

While uncommon in adults, an allergy to cow’s milk is the most common food allergy in young children. According to the National Institutes of Health, 5 to 15 percent of infants show adverse reactions to cow’s milk protein, such as lactose intolerance, and estimates of actual cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) vary from 2 percent to 7.5 percent. > >> read more ...

DIY Vitamin C Serum And Cream

DIY Vitamin C Serum And Cream

The Best Vitamin C Serum for Face can be made in the comfort of your own home!
This is an easy home made skin care recipe – a serum or Vitamin C Cream using essential oils and optional beeswax as an emollient to combine the ingredients.
This natural recipe contains essential oils known to be super rich in not only vitamin C, but also essential fatty acids (EFA’s) which help to nourish and protect skin.
Rosehip and carrot seed oil are known for their renewing and repairing properties, they also help to soften and firm skin.
You can also include other essential oils renowned for their antiaging and repairing properties such as Tamanu oil, Frankincense oil, Sea Buckthorn and many others.
The recipe below is a good basic one to make at home with plenty of benefits. The oils we have suggested absorb quickly into skin, you can add 5% wheatgerm and/or avocado if you have drier or more mature skin.
6 drops carrot seed oil. Rich in beta carotene and skin regenerative properties. Carrot seed oil is great for evening out skin tone, softening and smoothing skin. The vitamin A works like commercial retinols to stimulate and rejuvenate your skin. At the same time it fights skin problems such as psoriasis, eczema and other rashes. The formative action on the epidermal cells helps to keep wrinkles at bay and is also helpful for fighting liver (age) spots.
4 drops neroli or frankincense oil. These oils oil regenerate cells and speed up the cell renewal process for brighter younger looking skin. These oils also tighten and firm skin. You can add other oils to boost the serums effectiveness which you can read about on the second half of this post.
1 tsp rosehip oil. Rosehip oil is fast absorbing and is extremely rich in vitamin C helping to remove discoloration (age spots) or sun damage. Vitamin C rich rosehip oil is a luxurious treat for your skin.
8 tablespoons soybean, grape seed, almond or apricot kernel (apricot oil is the lightest followed by almond and soybean). Apricot oil is my favorite for it’s rapid absorption (I have oily skin even in my 40’s) and it leaves your skin feeling soft and youthful. It’s also rich in Vitamins A, C and E, all of which have anti-aging benefits for skin.
If making a lotion add 1 1/2 tablespoons beeswax (to make moisturizer instead of serum) and 1 tsp extra virgin coconut oil (optional)
Melt the last three ingredients together gently in a double boiler until just melted.  Stir together until well combined then allow to cool to room temperature before adding the essential oils.  You can add more or less beeswax depending on the thickness of the cream you like.  Adding two tablespoons would make it quite thick and creamy.
To make a diy vitamin serum
You don’t need to heat the mixture and also you can omit the beeswax – just mix the ingredients together and you’ll have an easy to make Vitamin C serum instead.
Store in a well washed container out of direct sunlight.  You can also add a pinch of ascorbic acid to the lotion mix if you like (not the serum) to give it some extra Vitamin C punch!
This recipe gives you approximately a 20% concentration of vitamin C in your serum anyhow which parallels many of the commercial brands vitamin serum C content. And that’s without the ascorbic acid!
Apply approximately 6 to 8 drops of this serum to your skin once to twice daily for smoother more even skin, and fewer wrinkles!
For more easy to make homemade skincare recipes and a comprehensive index ingredients and their uses check out: Natural Homemade Facemasks And Skincare Recipes
For a ready made all natural product that is loaded with many other ingredients with many more powerful anti-aging benefits for skin check out our: > >> read more ...

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