Obese Men Also Suffer ‘Weight Stigma’: Study

Obese Men Also Suffer ‘Weight Stigma’: Study


It’s a long-held stereotype that men are less self-conscious about their weight than women.

But a new study reveals that obese men are just as likely as women to be mistreated and stigmatized by others due to their excess pounds.

Two out of five men surveyed said they’ve been on the receiving end of weight stigma, “which is really similar to what we see in women,” said lead researcher Mary Himmelstein.

This is the first study to look specifically at weight bias targeting men, said Himmelstein, a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Connecticut’s Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity. > >> read more ...

Wide Waist with ‘normal Weight’ Bigger Risk than Obesity: Study

Wide Waist with ‘normal Weight’ Bigger Risk than Obesity: Study


People of “normal” weight who sport a wide waist are more at risk of heart problems than obese people, said researchers Friday, urging a rethink of healthy weight guidelines.

How fat is distributed on a person’s frame determined disease risk as much as how much fat they had overall, according to an investigation of nearly 1,700 people aged 45 and over.

Even people who are not classified overweight on the Body Mass Index (BMI) scale, should be concerned if they had an “apple” shape with a waist wider than their hips, said research leader Jose Medina-Inojosa of the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. > >> read more ...

Breakfast Fans Gain Less Weight: Study

Breakfast Fans Gain Less Weight: Study


Starting each day with breakfast may help you keep the pounds off through the years, a preliminary study finds.

The study, of nearly 350 healthy adults, found that those who usually ate breakfast had smaller waistlines and were less likely to be obese, compared to people who usually skipped breakfast.

And over the next dozen years, they gained only one-third the amount of weight that breakfast skippers did.

The findings don’t prove that morning meals, per se, thwart weight gain, the researchers said. > >> read more ...

Key Bad Habits That Cause Weight Gain

Key Bad Habits That Cause Weight Gain


It’s no secret that weight gain results from consuming too many calories. But at its core is an imbalance of healthy and unhealthy habits.

On one side of the scale — the healthy side — are foods such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables, lean protein and plant-based fats. On the other side are the not-so-healthy options — sugary foods, those high in saturated fats, and packaged and processed foods.

It’s not just the foods, though, that can cause weight issues. Unhealthy behaviors play a role, too. That’s because they can lead you to take in more calories, sometimes without even realizing it. > >> read more ...

Unintended Weight Loss Strong Predictor of Cancer

Unintended Weight Loss Strong Predictor of Cancer


A new UK meta-analysis has found that unintended weight loss is the second highest risk factor for certain cancers, including colorectal, lung, pancreatic and renal.

Led by the Universities of Oxford and Exeter, the research is the first robust analysis to examine all available evidence to look at an association between weight loss and cancer.

For the analysis the research looked at 25 studies, which together included data from more than 11.5 million patients.

The team found that unintended weight loss was linked with 10 types of cancer: colorectal, pancreatic, gastro-oesophageal, ovarian, lung, renal tract, myeloma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, biliary tree, and prostate. > >> read more ...

You Can Eat Pasta Without Weight Gain: Study

You Can Eat Pasta Without Weight Gain: Study


If you love your pasta but you’ve been avoiding it because you’re afraid it will cause you to pack on the pounds, cheer up. A new Canadian study found that even though pasta has gotten tons of bad publicity for its alleged part in the ongoing obesity epidemic, the negative attention may not be deserved.

Pasta is a refined carbohydrate, but unlike most other forms of refined carbs, which are quickly absorbed into the blood stream, pasta has a low glycemic index. A low glycemic index means it causes smaller increases in blood sugar levels than those caused by eating foods with a high glycemic index, such as potatoes, white wheat bread, and white rice. > >> read more ...

Forget Diets, Regular Meals Prevent Weight Gain: Study

Forget Diets, Regular Meals Prevent Weight Gain: Study


New European research has found that eating regular balanced meals is more effective in managing a healthy weight than dieting, which can actually cause weight gain.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Helsinki, the study looked at 2452 women and 2227 men to assess the common factors that influence weight gain in early adulthood, an important period for weight management as it can help with maintaining a healthy weight later in life.

The participants were asked to answer surveys which looked at various factors influencing weight changes at the start of the study at age 24, and ten years later at age 34.The researchers found that only around a quarter of participants were able to avoid weight gain during the ten years (28.6% of women and 23.0% of men), and just 7.5% of women and 3.8% of men lost weight during this time. > >> read more ...

Hunger Hormones: How to Control Them to Lose Weight

Hunger Hormones: How to Control Them to Lose Weight


If you think losing weight is only about moving more and eating less, then think again. In fact, hunger hormones — tied to metabolism — are a significant factor in weight gain and loss. And controlling them may be the best way to safely shed pounds, experts say.

“Most people can lose weight,” says endocrinologist Dr. Scott Isaacs. “Keeping it off is the challenge.”

That’s, in part, because your body is probably working against you, if you’re trying to lose weight. Here’s why: For most of human existence, losing weight was a potentially life-threatening condition. So once you start shedding pounds, your body instinctively adapts by going into starvation mode, unleashing hormones that boost your appetite and conserve your fat. > >> read more ...

Weight Loss Has ‘Ripple Effect’ on Couples

Weight Loss Has ‘Ripple Effect’ on Couples


When one-half of a couple embraces good health, there’s a higher likelihood that the other half will, too, a recent study suggests.

“The concept is called the ripple effect and it means that weight loss interventions delivered to one spouse have unintended, but positive benefits on the other spouse,” said study coauthor Amy Gorin, Associate Professor in Psychological Sciences at the University of Connecticut in Storrs. “That is, spouses that are not actively involved in (a diet) treatment also tend to lose weight.” > >> read more ...

Pressure to Diet as Teen Leads to Food and Weight Problems Later: Study

Pressure to Diet as Teen Leads to Food and Weight Problems Later: Study


Adults who were pressured by their parents to diet during adolescence may have a higher risk of obesity and eating disorders as adults than people who weren’t urged to lose weight as teens, a U.S. study suggests.
As parents, adults who endured dieting pressure during their teen years were also more likely to encourage their own children to watch what they ate, researchers report in Pediatrics, online March 6.

“When adolescents were encouraged to diet by their parents, they were more likely to be overweight, engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors, binge eat and diet, and to have lower body satisfaction as adults,” said lead study author Jerica Berge of the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis. > >> read more ...